ASN Executive Vice President Tod Ibrahim Named President of CMSS

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Tod Ibrahim

Tod Ibrahim, ASN executive vice president, has been named president of the Council of Medical Specialty Societies (CMSS). His term took effect in November 2019.

“CMSS is uniquely positioned to help address pressing clinical topics, research-related issues, and educational topics common to its members,” Ibrahim said. “There is an opportunity to think creatively across specialties, and that was really appealing to me.”

Founded in 1965, CMSS provides an independent forum for the discussion by medical specialists of issues of national interest and mutual concern. The organization currently has 46 national medical society members representing more than 800,000 physicians.

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Tod Ibrahim

Citation: Kidney News 12, 3

Tod Ibrahim, ASN executive vice president, has been named president of the Council of Medical Specialty Societies (CMSS). His term took effect in November 2019.

“CMSS is uniquely positioned to help address pressing clinical topics, research-related issues, and educational topics common to its members,” Ibrahim said. “There is an opportunity to think creatively across specialties, and that was really appealing to me.”

Founded in 1965, CMSS provides an independent forum for the discussion by medical specialists of issues of national interest and mutual concern. The organization currently has 46 national medical society members representing more than 800,000 physicians. ASN has been a member of CMSS for nearly 10 years.

Ibrahim succeeds Ken Bertka, MD, FAAFP, CPHMS, a past member of the board of directors of the American Academy of Family Physicians, and David B. Hoyt, MD, FACS, executive director of the American College of Surgeons. Darilyn Moyer, MD, FACP, executive vice president and CEO of the American College of Physicians, is president-elect.

Ibrahim said that in this role, he will continue strategic planning efforts begun by his predecessors. These efforts include exploring how CMSS can support the role of physicians and physician organizations in being responsible for their own oversight. CMSS is committed to helping medical societies determine their roles in working with new entrants to the healthcare arena to improve healthcare for all Americans, planning for changes in digital health and in the consolidation and corporatization occurring in healthcare, and in undertaking a comprehensive assessment of physician competency and activities related to learning and continuing medical education.

“We are thrilled to have Tod this year as our president,” said Helen Burstin, MD, MPH, MACP, CMSS’ executive vice president and CEO. “He brings a remarkable background working for organizations in nephrology as well as internal medicine. It’s really a testament to his leadership that he was selected as president, which is a position typically reserved only for CEOs who also are physicians. That says a huge amount about our members’ respect for his knowledge and his sense of recognition about pressing issues in our fields.”

Ibrahim previously had worked with CMSS on educational activities related to common challenges faced by CEOs and other key staff at the member societies, and on organizing policy leaders from the societies to come together on issues around research funding, certification, and appropriate funding for medical education.

Before joining ASN in 2008, Ibrahim was founding executive vice president of the Alliance for Academic Internal Medicine, director of public policy for the Association of Professors of Medicine, director of communications for Robert Betz Associates, and a staff assistant for US Rep. Thomas C. Sawyer (D-OH). A two-time recipient of George Washington University’s Jenny McKean Moore scholarship for poets, he has a master’s degree in liberal arts from Johns Hopkins University and a bachelor’s degree in English from the University of Maryland, College Park.

Ibrahim is the author or coauthor of many articles, including “Maintenance of Certification, Self-Regulation, and the Decline of Physician Autonomy”; “Overcoming Barriers in Kidney Health—Forging a Platform for Innovation”; “The Kidney Research Predicament”; “The Future Nephrology Workforce: Will There Be One?”; “Globalization: A New Dimension for Academic Internal Medicine”; and “Centers, Institutes, and the Future of Clinical Departments.” He also coauthored the chapter “Understanding, Navigating, and Leveraging US Medicine” for the Guidebook for Clerkship Directors.

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