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Steven Menez
,
Ashveena L. Dighe
,
Ian H. de Boer
, and
for the Kidney Precision Medicine Project for the Kidney Precision Medicine Project

The Kidney Precision Medicine Project (KPMP) is a National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)-funded, multi-year collaboration of leading research institutions across the United States that aims to better understand the mechanisms of acute kidney injury (AKI) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) ( 1 ). Our understanding of the pathophysiology of certain kidney diseases has improved dramatically in recent years, with discovery of the genetic mechanisms behind

Jonathan Himmelfarb

Jonathan Himmelfarb The Kidney Precision Medicine Project (KPMP) is a transformative initiative funded by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. It is designed to tackle the major public health burdens resulting from acute kidney injury (AKI) and chronic kidney disease (CKD). The rationale for KPMP is straightforward: Despite the significant impact of AKI and CKD on patient outcomes, no proven safe and effective therapies exist for AKI, and only a few are

understanding of the natural history and variability of human kidney diseases.” Below is NIDDK’s announcement and links to several opportunities to learn more about this exciting initiative that promises to help transform care for patients with kidney diseases. The NIDDK Kidney Precision Medicine Project (KPMP) The KPMP aims to ethically obtain and evaluate human kidney biopsies from participants with Acute Kidney Injury or Chronic Kidney Disease, create a kidney tissue atlas, define disease

Laura H. Mariani

Laura H. Mariani “The future belongs to those who believe in the beauty of their dreams.” — Eleanor Roosevelt Working with the Kidney Precision Medicine Project (KPMP) consortium as a junior investigator is a tremendous opportunity for me, with tangible training experiences and many more intangible moments for professional growth and creativity. Certainly, the tangible training experiences are exceptional, and the KPMP consortium has not only allowed, but encouraged, contributions from junior

Bridget M. Kuehn

A recently published, three-dimensional (3D) molecular atlas of the human kidney in healthy and disease states may help accelerate research to provide more personalized approaches to kidney disease care. The results were published July 19, 2023, in Nature ( 1 ) and provide a detailed account of the atlas. The work is the result of a close collaboration between two large consortia: the Kidney Precision Medicine Project (KPMP) ( 2 ), which focuses on mapping kidney diseases and progression

potential benefits of biopsy collection to their own health care. The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) is launching the Kidney Precision Medicine Program (KPMP) in summer 2017, with the goal of ethically and safely obtaining and evaluating human kidney biopsies from research participants with AKI or CKD; creating a kidney tissue atlas; defining disease subgroups; and identifying critical cells, interstitial components, and pathways that can be targeted for novel

great work that NIDDK is conducting, specifically highlighting the Kidney Precision Medicine Project (KPMP). A revolutionary project, KPMP aims to identify critical human cells, pathways, and targets for new therapies in acute and chronic kidney diseases by obtaining and evaluating human kidney biopsies. Paul Conway, American Association of Kidney Patients (AAKP) President and Richard Knight, AAKP Vice President and Chair of Public Policy shared their thoughts on how patients not only benefit

James F. George
and
Anupam Agarwal

Advancements in single cell and spatial transcriptomics, advanced imaging, and proteomics are revolutionizing our understanding of the biology of the kidney in health and disease. An exemplar of such pioneering work is the product of a collaboration between the Kidney Precision Medicine Project (KPMP) and The Human BioMolecular Atlas Program (HuBMAP), resulting in a detailed atlas of cell states and niches in both healthy and injured human kidneys. Supported by the National Institute of

Ryan Murray

the federal government to investing in efforts to conquer kidney diseases. In a letter to CSR , ASN President Anupam Agarwal, MD, FASN noted that promoting kidney health is now a national priority, writing: “NIH, and the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive Kidney Diseases in particular, has increased its support of pioneering research in an effort to uncover to groundbreaking discoveries that reduce the risk of kidney failure by funding the Kidney Precision Medicine Project (KPMP

Mark D. Okusa

the NIH/NIDDK Kidney Precision Medicine Project (KPMP). A critical barrier to advances in AKI/CKD therapies is the use of non-predictive animal models. The goal of KPMP is to obtain human kidney biopsies in order to define subgroup phenotypes, to identify critical pathways and targets for novel therapies, and ultimately to deliver individualized care for patients with kidney diseases. I am also excited about the Kidney Health Initiative, a partnership between the ASN and FDA to improve kidney