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Melanie S. Joy

Clinicians are trained to review prescription drugs with patients during their clinic visits and hospital admissions. However, less emphasis is placed on appropriate review and documentation of foods and nutrients that are known or suspected to interact with medications. This scenario places kidney disease patients at significant risk, given the 10 to 12 different medications that are typically prescribed (1). Although the clinician’s time is a limiting factor in conducting nutrient reviews, an even greater problem is the lack of knowledge by clinicians of what nutrients can interact with which drugs and the mechanisms for the interactions. The

Melanie S Joy

Clinicians are trained to review prescription drugs with patients during their clinic visits and hospital admissions. However, less emphasis is placed on appropriate review and documentation of foods and nutrients that are known or suspected to interact with medications. This scenario places kidney disease patients at significant risk, given the 10 to 12 different medications that are typically prescribed (1). Although the clinician’s time is a limiting factor in conducting nutrient reviews, an even greater problem is the lack of knowledge by clinicians of what nutrients can interact with which drugs and the mechanisms for the interactions. The purpose of this article is to inform clinicians caring for patients with kidney disease by providing a concise overview of nutrients—defined as vitamins, minerals, herbs, and food supplements—that can interact with prescribed medications.