Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 2 of 2 items for

  • Author or Editor: Elinor C. Mannon x
  • Refine by Content Type: All x
Clear All Modify Search
Jermaine G. Johnston and Elinor C. Mannon

The start of a new year often signals a time for reflection. As we move through 2022, we again may find ourselves asking: What is the state of nephrology research? How are trainees fairing as they build their own independent careers in this field? There are many sources of support that assist trainees at all levels as they hone the skills necessary for scientific investigation. However, this career path is not without challenges, including, but not limited to, scientific investigation funding, time that is dedicated for investigation, support to build a professional network, and the current lack of diversity in

Elinor C. Mannon, Matthew A. Sparks, and Samira S. Farouk

Mentorship and early educational experiences play critical roles in influencing trainees' long-term career goals, and the field of nephrology is no exception. Like any specialty, one's decision to pursue nephrology likely results from a combination of clinical experiences, nephrology education, and mentorship both during medical school and residency. A majority of nephrology fellows previously reported deciding to pursue a nephrology fellowship during residency (1), and 33% of US internal medicine subspecialty fellows who did not choose nephrology identified the lack of a clear mentor as being one of the reasons for not doing so (2). Additionally,