Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 137 items for

  • Author or Editor: David White x
  • Refine by Content Type: All x
Clear All Modify Search
David White

After strenuous objection from the American Society of Nephrology (ASN) and its fellow coalition members in the Partnership for Part D Access, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) issued a final rule on May 16, 2019, on Medicare Part D prescription drugs that dropped an earlier CMS proposal that would have undermined current protections for the six protected classes of drugs. The final rule maintains protections for these classes: 1) antidepressants; 2) antipsychotics; 3) anticonvulsants; 4) immunosuppressants for treatment of transplant rejection; 5) antiretrovirals; and 6) antineoplastics. ASN Policy wrote about an administration proposal to alter the status of the six classes earlier this year in KNO when ASN submitted  comments  to Medicare on its Medicare Advantage and Part D Drug Pricing Proposed Rule on January 25.

David White

The American Society of Nephrology (ASN) submitted comments to Medicare on its Medicare Advantage and Part D Drug Pricing Proposed Rule on January 25.  ASN objected to segments of the proposed rule that remove protections from the “six protected classes of drugs” in Medicare Part D. Specifically, ASN objected to proposals to:

David White

On Thursday, December 17 from 5:00 - 6:30 pm EST the American Society of Nephrology will host a webinar reviewing key components of the ESRD Treatment Choices (ETC) Model (going into effect January 1, 2021).

This webinar will be an opportunity for ASN members to learn important details about the federal government’s mandatory model to use payment policy to increase kidney patient choice of home dialysis and kidney transplantation.  ETC will include 30% of Medicare ESRD beneficiaries, nephrologists, and dialysis facilities randomized from hospital referral regions (HRRs) across the country. 

David White

ASN is hearing from nephrologists in multiple COVID-19 hot spots that their patients are facing serious logistical transportation challenges, specifically with ensuring COVID-19 patients can access safe transportation to dialysis facilities. The ramifications are significant and include barriers to discharging kidney failure patients with COVID-19 from hospitals, risks of admitting patients to hospitals who cannot get to dialysis facilities, and risks of spreading COVID-19 during transportation. While nephrologists and dialysis facilities are coordinating with state and local authorities, there is also a role for the Department of Health and Human Services.