Dr. Dall'Era speaks about upcoming talk on Lupus Nephritis at Winter Rheumatology Symposium

The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) is hosting the Winter Rheumatology Symposium from January 20 – 26, 2018 in Snowmass Village, CO. The program aims to “provide the most up-to-date, practical clinical information on the diagnosis and management of patients with rheumatic and immune disorders”.

ACR winter.PNG

Kidney News Online (KNO) spoke with Dr. Maria Dall’Era, a professor of medicine in the Division of Rheumatology at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) and director of the UCSF Lupus Clinic and the Rheumatology Clinical Research Center. She will present a talk on January 25th at the Symposium entitled “Update on Lupus Nephritis”. In the following, Dr. Dall’Era shares her thoughts:

1. How would you briefly describe the main topic of your talk?

My talk will provide an update on the treatment of lupus nephritis (LN) – where we are now, and where we are headed.  The talk is divided into three sections: i) update on the current treatment paradigm for LN, ii) emerging therapies for the treatment of LN with an emphasis on multi-target therapy with voclosporin and novel combinations of B-cell depletion therapies, and iii) clinical conundrums commonly faced by the practicing rheumatologist and nephrologist in the treatment of LN.  The two conundrums that I will discuss include decisions about the dose and duration of steroid treatment and decisions about the length of maintenance therapy.  These two issues are encountered frequently in the care of LN patients, and there are no definitive answers. However, data from the LN literature may be useful to inform our thinking in these areas.

2. Will your work and/or research further patient care, new research, or both? How?

I am hopeful that this talk will provide practicing rheumatologists and nephrologists with evidence-based guidance on the contemporary treatment of LN as well as promising, upcoming novel therapies and studies. I believe that my current research of novel agents for the treatment of LN as well as my work investigating outcome measures in LN will further successful drug development for this disease.  Our ultimate goal is to treat LN patients in a strategic, personalized manner that improves long-term outcomes.

3. Do you believe there is more that can be done with nephrologists and rheumatologists working together?

The close collaboration between nephrologists and rheumatologists is critical to the successful care of LN patients and the preservation of long-term kidney health.  The healthcare community should take steps to ensure this partnership.  If possible, a joint nephrology-rheumatology clinic may work well for the care of these complex patients.

4. What can you say about the future of lupus nephritis in the next few years?

I believe that the future is bright. There is remarkable clinical trial activity in lupus nephritis using molecules targeting various immunologic pathways believed to be important in the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis. As novel biologic medications are developed and new sequences and combinations of biologic and conventional medications are studied, the established paradigm for the treatment of lupus nephritis will continue to evolve. In parallel with drug development, ongoing work to create and validate renal response measures will lead to more rigorous clinical trial design. Lastly, ongoing studies examining cellular and molecular phenotyping of renal tissue will continue to enhance our understanding of the dysregulated immunological pathways that underlie LN. The Accelerating Medicines Partnership is an example of a collaborative network conducting basic and translational studies in this area.  With this foundation, we will have the best opportunity to determine which treatment strategies are most effective for which patients at which time point in their disease.

If you have any further questions for Dr. Dall'Era or on the broader topic, please contact Kidney News Online at info@kidneynews.org.

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The American College of Rheumatology (ACR) is hosting the Winter Rheumatology Symposium from January 20 – 26, 2018 in Snowmass Village, CO. The program aims to “provide the most up-to-date, practical clinical information on the diagnosis and management of patients with rheumatic and immune disorders”.

ACR winter.PNG

Kidney News Online (KNO) spoke with Dr. Maria Dall’Era, a professor of medicine in the Division of Rheumatology at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) and director of the UCSF Lupus Clinic and the Rheumatology Clinical Research Center. She will present a talk on January 25th at the Symposium entitled “Update on Lupus Nephritis”. In the following, Dr. Dall’Era shares her thoughts:

1. How would you briefly describe the main topic of your talk?

My talk will provide an update on the treatment of lupus nephritis (LN) – where we are now, and where we are headed.  The talk is divided into three sections: i) update on the current treatment paradigm for LN, ii) emerging therapies for the treatment of LN with an emphasis on multi-target therapy with voclosporin and novel combinations of B-cell depletion therapies, and iii) clinical conundrums commonly faced by the practicing rheumatologist and nephrologist in the treatment of LN.  The two conundrums that I will discuss include decisions about the dose and duration of steroid treatment and decisions about the length of maintenance therapy.  These two issues are encountered frequently in the care of LN patients, and there are no definitive answers. However, data from the LN literature may be useful to inform our thinking in these areas.

2. Will your work and/or research further patient care, new research, or both? How?

I am hopeful that this talk will provide practicing rheumatologists and nephrologists with evidence-based guidance on the contemporary treatment of LN as well as promising, upcoming novel therapies and studies. I believe that my current research of novel agents for the treatment of LN as well as my work investigating outcome measures in LN will further successful drug development for this disease.  Our ultimate goal is to treat LN patients in a strategic, personalized manner that improves long-term outcomes.

3. Do you believe there is more that can be done with nephrologists and rheumatologists working together?

The close collaboration between nephrologists and rheumatologists is critical to the successful care of LN patients and the preservation of long-term kidney health.  The healthcare community should take steps to ensure this partnership.  If possible, a joint nephrology-rheumatology clinic may work well for the care of these complex patients.

4. What can you say about the future of lupus nephritis in the next few years?

I believe that the future is bright. There is remarkable clinical trial activity in lupus nephritis using molecules targeting various immunologic pathways believed to be important in the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis. As novel biologic medications are developed and new sequences and combinations of biologic and conventional medications are studied, the established paradigm for the treatment of lupus nephritis will continue to evolve. In parallel with drug development, ongoing work to create and validate renal response measures will lead to more rigorous clinical trial design. Lastly, ongoing studies examining cellular and molecular phenotyping of renal tissue will continue to enhance our understanding of the dysregulated immunological pathways that underlie LN. The Accelerating Medicines Partnership is an example of a collaborative network conducting basic and translational studies in this area.  With this foundation, we will have the best opportunity to determine which treatment strategies are most effective for which patients at which time point in their disease.

If you have any further questions for Dr. Dall'Era or on the broader topic, please contact Kidney News Online at info@kidneynews.org.

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Date:
Monday, January 22, 2018