ASN President Agarwal and NKF President Kramer call for increased investment for prevention and research in COVID-19 and kidney disease relationship

By ASN Staff

June 23, 2020

In an editorial released on June 23rd by The Hill ASN President Anupam Agarwal, MD, FASN and NKF President Kramer, MD, MPH expressed that the intersection of COVID-19 and kidney disease is fraught with potential calamities and investment for prevention and research are necessary.

Kidney patients – including those with kidney failure receiving dialysis and transplant recipients – are more at risk from SARS-CoV-2 exposure because of their vulnerable physical conditions, weakened immune systems, and the open settings in which they receive care. Data has shown that people with kidney diseases were 2.5 times more likely to die than other hospitalized patients with COVID-19. And recent data released from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services showed that kidney disease patients undergoing dialysis were hospitalized with COVID-19 at a rate of 1,341 hospitalizations per 100,000 beneficiaries, the highest hospitalization rate among all Medicare beneficiaries. In fact, the first few deaths that occurred in the state of Washington were patients with kidney disease. Kidney disease also disproportionately affects minority populations, a population at higher risk for COVID-19 and COVID-19 associated mortality compared to non-minority populations,” states the editorial.

In order to address these issues, “the kidney community is urging Congress to appropriate $100 million in emergency supplemental funding for the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), to answer some of these urgent questions about COVID-19 and kidney health, and $200 million for KidneyX to address the needs of people with kidney diseases for the current COVID-19 crisis and future crises by catalyzing the development of an artificial kidney to allow patients to safely receive care at home and mitigate hemodialysis supply shortages that arise in crises. We also call on Congress to invest in programs that educate, inform and empower Americans with kidney diseases to reduce their exposure to SARS-CoV-2 , to understand how to respond to a potential infection, and to increase general awareness about the risk of kidney diseases.”

Additionally, “a recent National Kidney Foundation-Harris Poll Survey on COVID-19 and Kidney Health showed that a majority of Americans support these investments, with 87 percent of respondents stating that they support “the federal government devoting more resources towards the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of kidney diseases and significantly increasing funding for kidney research at the National Institutes of Health as a result of kidney-related illness resulting from COVID-19.”

For the full piece, please visit The Hill.

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In an editorial released on June 23rd by The Hill ASN President Anupam Agarwal, MD, FASN and NKF President Kramer, MD, MPH expressed that the intersection of COVID-19 and kidney disease is fraught with potential calamities and investment for prevention and research are necessary.

Kidney patients – including those with kidney failure receiving dialysis and transplant recipients – are more at risk from SARS-CoV-2 exposure because of their vulnerable physical conditions, weakened immune systems, and the open settings in which they receive care. Data has shown that people with kidney diseases were 2.5 times more likely to die than other hospitalized patients with COVID-19. And recent data released from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services showed that kidney disease patients undergoing dialysis were hospitalized with COVID-19 at a rate of 1,341 hospitalizations per 100,000 beneficiaries, the highest hospitalization rate among all Medicare beneficiaries. In fact, the first few deaths that occurred in the state of Washington were patients with kidney disease. Kidney disease also disproportionately affects minority populations, a population at higher risk for COVID-19 and COVID-19 associated mortality compared to non-minority populations,” states the editorial.

In order to address these issues, “the kidney community is urging Congress to appropriate $100 million in emergency supplemental funding for the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), to answer some of these urgent questions about COVID-19 and kidney health, and $200 million for KidneyX to address the needs of people with kidney diseases for the current COVID-19 crisis and future crises by catalyzing the development of an artificial kidney to allow patients to safely receive care at home and mitigate hemodialysis supply shortages that arise in crises. We also call on Congress to invest in programs that educate, inform and empower Americans with kidney diseases to reduce their exposure to SARS-CoV-2 , to understand how to respond to a potential infection, and to increase general awareness about the risk of kidney diseases.”

Additionally, “a recent National Kidney Foundation-Harris Poll Survey on COVID-19 and Kidney Health showed that a majority of Americans support these investments, with 87 percent of respondents stating that they support “the federal government devoting more resources towards the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of kidney diseases and significantly increasing funding for kidney research at the National Institutes of Health as a result of kidney-related illness resulting from COVID-19.”

For the full piece, please visit The Hill.

Date:
Tuesday, June 23, 2020