ASN Leader Proposes Solutions to National Organ Shortage

By Zachary Kribs

January 27, 2020

On Thursday, January 23 ASN Councilor Crystal Gadegbeku, MD, FASN, along with 4 co-authors representing leading voices in organ and transplant policy, proposed a suite of improvements to the United States’ organ procurement and donation system at the launch of the highly-anticipated Day One Project.

Joined by former Obama and Trump administration staff (including ASN President’s Medal recipient Abe Sutton) as well as the Executive Director of the Global Liver Institute and a patient advocate, Dr. Gadegbeku highlighted four ASN goals that should be prioritized:

  1. Improving organ procurement organization performance and transparency
  2. Better supporting living donors
  3. Supporting and fully funding KidneyX
  4. Creating a new office of organ policy to streamline transplant work within the Department of Health and Human Services.
     

The mission of the nonpartisan Day One Project is to identify the scientific, technology, and innovation policy issues that should be priorities of the incoming administration on its first day in office, regardless of party affiliation. During the launch event for Day One Project’s initial 15 policy proposals, Department of Health and Human Services Secretary Alex M. Azar II conducted a 30-minute fireside chat focused on the importance of improving our nation’s transplant system  and the administration’s larger commitment to transforming kidney care.

Describing the national organ shortage as “one of the most persistent, expensive, and yet solvable public-health challenges of our time,” Dr. Gadegbeku and co-authors argued that an incoming administration “can build on recent actions from HHS and the White House to right the ship through a mix of commonsense reforms to help patients waiting now, as well as smart policies and targeted investments that will change what is possible for patients in the near future.” The paper, tilted “Addressing the Organ Donor Crisis” can be accessed on the Day One Project website.

Category:
Subcategory:
Author:
Zachary Kribs
Body:

On Thursday, January 23 ASN Councilor Crystal Gadegbeku, MD, FASN, along with 4 co-authors representing leading voices in organ and transplant policy, proposed a suite of improvements to the United States’ organ procurement and donation system at the launch of the highly-anticipated Day One Project.

Joined by former Obama and Trump administration staff (including ASN President’s Medal recipient Abe Sutton) as well as the Executive Director of the Global Liver Institute and a patient advocate, Dr. Gadegbeku highlighted four ASN goals that should be prioritized:

  1. Improving organ procurement organization performance and transparency
  2. Better supporting living donors
  3. Supporting and fully funding KidneyX
  4. Creating a new office of organ policy to streamline transplant work within the Department of Health and Human Services.
     

The mission of the nonpartisan Day One Project is to identify the scientific, technology, and innovation policy issues that should be priorities of the incoming administration on its first day in office, regardless of party affiliation. During the launch event for Day One Project’s initial 15 policy proposals, Department of Health and Human Services Secretary Alex M. Azar II conducted a 30-minute fireside chat focused on the importance of improving our nation’s transplant system  and the administration’s larger commitment to transforming kidney care.

Describing the national organ shortage as “one of the most persistent, expensive, and yet solvable public-health challenges of our time,” Dr. Gadegbeku and co-authors argued that an incoming administration “can build on recent actions from HHS and the White House to right the ship through a mix of commonsense reforms to help patients waiting now, as well as smart policies and targeted investments that will change what is possible for patients in the near future.” The paper, tilted “Addressing the Organ Donor Crisis” can be accessed on the Day One Project website.

Date:
Monday, January 27, 2020