ASN, along with 36 kidney organizations, signed letter to Senate Appropriations for additional kidney research funding at NIH

By Zachary Kribs

On Monday, April 23, the American Society of Nephrology and a record-setting coalition of 36 other organizations in the kidney community, authored a letter to the leadership of the House and Senate Appropriations Subcommittees that appropriate funds for the National Institutes of Health (NIH).  ASN and others urged Appropriations leadership to support a $2.2 billion increase for the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) in Fiscal Year (FY) 2019, as well as a $150 million appropriation for a Special Kidney Program.

The letter, signed by ASN and a record total of 36 other organizations representing patients, health professionals, and industry stakeholders across the spectrum of kidney care, demonstrates the immense and unprecedented depth of support in the kidney community for innovation and discovery.

Citing a January 2017 GAO report that found that the federal government spent more treating kidney failure than on the entire allocation for the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and recent breakthroughs in kidney research spearheaded by NIDDK, the organizations said it was “imperative”  for Congress to foster innovation and discovery in kidney care to “deliver better outcomes for patients” and “bring greater value to the Medicare program.”

The organizations also noted that a Special Kidney Program, modeled after the Type I Special Diabetes Program which recently developed the Artificial Pancreas, would foster breakthroughs in kidney therapies and cures. By supplementing regular NIDDK appropriations with a Special Kidney Program, the organizations hoped to generate similar advances in kidney medicine. 

With just 1 percent of the total cost of care for kidney failure alone allocated to kidney research at the NIH, greater investment in innovation and discovery in kidney research is needed to improve the care of and bring new advances to the more than 40 million Americans with kidney diseases.

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On Monday, April 23, the American Society of Nephrology and a record-setting coalition of 36 other organizations in the kidney community, authored a letter to the leadership of the House and Senate Appropriations Subcommittees that appropriate funds for the National Institutes of Health (NIH).  ASN and others urged Appropriations leadership to support a $2.2 billion increase for the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) in Fiscal Year (FY) 2019, as well as a $150 million appropriation for a Special Kidney Program.

The letter, signed by ASN and a record total of 36 other organizations representing patients, health professionals, and industry stakeholders across the spectrum of kidney care, demonstrates the immense and unprecedented depth of support in the kidney community for innovation and discovery.

Citing a January 2017 GAO report that found that the federal government spent more treating kidney failure than on the entire allocation for the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and recent breakthroughs in kidney research spearheaded by NIDDK, the organizations said it was “imperative”  for Congress to foster innovation and discovery in kidney care to “deliver better outcomes for patients” and “bring greater value to the Medicare program.”

The organizations also noted that a Special Kidney Program, modeled after the Type I Special Diabetes Program which recently developed the Artificial Pancreas, would foster breakthroughs in kidney therapies and cures. By supplementing regular NIDDK appropriations with a Special Kidney Program, the organizations hoped to generate similar advances in kidney medicine. 

With just 1 percent of the total cost of care for kidney failure alone allocated to kidney research at the NIH, greater investment in innovation and discovery in kidney research is needed to improve the care of and bring new advances to the more than 40 million Americans with kidney diseases.

Date:
Wednesday, April 25, 2018