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In a joint statement, the American Society of Nephrology, European Renal Association, and International Society of Nephrology discuss the state of the global nephrology workforce.

ASN and other groups are urging Congress and the Administration to make a critical investment in the nation’s health care delivery system by maintaining the 3.75% increase to the CF through at least calendar years 2022 and 2023.  

ASN Executive Vice President Tod Ibrahim and ASN Regulatory and Quality Officer David White offer insights about federal funding for kidney research, visas for international medical graduates, and the Equality Act.

More than 37,000,000 Americans are affected by kidney diseases, and inequities and disparities have long plagued the care for many of those affected. In a series of key recommendations to the Biden Administration, ASN pledged its support to address the twin public health crises of COVID-19 and systemic racism. 

The American Society of Nephrology (ASN) strongly condemns the rise in hate crimes against Asian Americans throughout the United States. During the past year, more than 3,500 accounts of such incidents were reported, and ASN is committed to doing everything possible to prevent these injustices.

The long push for payment models to cross the silos of kidney care – chronic kidney disease (CKD), kidney failure and dialysis, and kidney transplant – continues with newly announced modifications to the implementation timeline of the Kidney Care Choices (KCC) Model, often referred to as the voluntary model.  The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation (CMMI), which creates models and created the ESCOs, has extended the implementation period from March 31, 2021, until December 31, 2021. The effective performance year that was scheduled to begin April 1, 2021 will now begin January 1, 2022.

Approximately 50 percent of dialysis patients in the United States are Black, Latinx, Native American, or Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islanders (NHPIs).  These individuals are underrepresented in COVID-19 vaccination rates. In Virginia, for instance, Black people represent 19% of residents while accounting for 21% of the state’s COVID-19 cases and 24% of its deaths; however, Black Virginians have received only 12% of vaccines administered in the state to date.2

Brian Hess, a lifelong kidney advocate, passed away on December 3, 2020.

Despite being diagnosed with kidney disease at a young age and undergoing dialysis for the majority of his life, Brian refused to let kidney disease slow him down. Brian graduated from the University of Central Oklahoma while maintaining his dialysis regime.

Dialysis patients incur a greater burden of illness compared to the general population, and those dependent on maintenance dialysis are extremely vulnerable to the effects of infection with Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2, observe the authors of a recent article, “Prioritizing COVID-19 Vaccination in Dialysis.”

To read the article, click here .    

Bipartisan bill has been ASN's top legislative priority since 2009

Congress is passing the Comprehensive Immunosuppressive Drug Coverage for Kidney Transplant Patients Act as part of priority year-end package.

This legislation extends Medicare coverage of live-saving immunosuppressive medications for kidney transplant patients for the life of the kidney transplant. Currently coverage is restricted to 36 months post transplant: patients who cannot obtain private coverage and are unable to afford the medications lose their transplanted kidney and return to dialysis. About 375 people annually are estimated to lose their kidney transplant because they cannot afford immunosuppressives.