Fellows Corner

Hurricane Michael made landfall as an unprecedented category 5 hurricane in the Florida panhandle, with maximum sustained wind speeds of 155 mph at 1 p.m. on October 10, 2018. Along the Florida panhandle, the cities of Mexico Beach and Panama City suffered the worst of Michael, with catastrophic damage reported (1).

Camilo Cortesi

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The coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has brought the interaction of the lung and kidney to the fore. Nephrologists have worked in tandem with critical care to manage the acute kidney injury (AKI) that has increasingly occurred in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) as a result of COVID-19.

Medicare began paying for eight telemedicine visits a year instead of 12 face-to-face visits as of January 2019. This allows patients to avoid missing work and reduces exposure to inclement weather, as in Anna’s family’s case. In addition, telemedicine visits save the family and the nephrologist travel expense.

Nissreen Elfadawy

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I recently started practicing nephrology and wish to share a few reflections.

Harini Bejjanki                            Abhilash Koratala

Aditya S. Pawar

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Sarvie Esmaeilzadeh

Blood pressure (BP) is a dynamic entity and, just like many other orders in nature, is affected by variability. Studies have shown variability in an individual’s BP over seconds, minutes, and days. This variability has been found to correlate with morbidity and mortality events. This review is intended to highlight some basic concepts of this entity with a focus on measures of variability and outcomes. The types of BP variability are shown in Table 1 (1).

Crystal Farrington, DO

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Twenty years ago, a young newlywed senior nephrology fellow set out on a job interview. She sat down with the practice’s senior partners, who asked her general interview questions, including, “Why are you interested in joining our practice?” and “Where do you see yourself in five years?”

Samaya Qureshi

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As my fellowship inches toward completion, a new path is on the horizon. With anticipation, I am ready to embark on a new academic career in nephrology.

Samira Farouk, MD

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During my rotation as a nephrology fellow at a high-volume liver transplantation center, I vividly remember an afternoon consultation from the medical team’s intern: “Our patient needs a simultaneous liver-kidney transplant (SLKT).”

Sapna Shah

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Rare is the occasion when business training intersects with medical education.

 

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Corey Cavanaugh, DO


Many influences propelled me along the course that ultimately allowed me to train with some of the best minds in nephrology as an osteopathic medical graduate and current clinical nephrology fellow at Yale.

On January 21, 2017, I, as a blessed research fellow without call responsibilities, participated in a local Women’s Day march. The messages of the day, in the context of the last few months of political rancor, had led me to consider how our country’s political and social trajectory might affect a patient’s health.

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Improvised hastily by a young physician to avoid the embarrassment from direct auscultation of a particularly buxom patient’s chest, the stethoscope recently celebrated its 200th anniversary. After initial resistance, it has since become standard of care and a ubiquitous icon of the physician (1).

 

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Bloodstream infections (BSI) among hemodialysis patients are among the most challenging problems in dialysis units, and are associated with significant morbidity and mortality (1).

Daniel Edmonston, MD

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Despite initiatives to improve access and delivery of preventive care, much of medicine is still reactionary. We wait behind brick-and-mortar walls for our patients to come to us with a list of problems in hand.

Medical students and residents are often intimidated by renal physiology and struggle to understand the many aspects of the kidney’s role in medical disease. If trainees have trouble grasping the complexities of the kidney, it should come as no surprise that our patients feel the same way.

My grandmother’s struggle with chronic kidney disease (CKD) motivated me to consider, and ultimately choose, medicine as a career. During medical school, I had the opportunity to work with a nephrologist and attend renal clinics with him. I was intrigued by the complexity of patients with kidney disease and felt pulled toward a career in internal medicine and nephrology, which brought me to the University at Buffalo for my internal medicine residency.

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As the new academic year begins, nephrology fellows beginning their adult nephrology training can look back at the application process with a unique perspective compared with previous years’ fellows. They are the first class to enter the fellowship through the National Resident Match Program. The match has been considered a success in the fellowship community (Kohan and Rosenberg, 2009).

Attending the American Society of Nephrology (ASN) conference in November 2005 as a second year resident inspired me to pursue nephrology training upon finishing my residency in internal medicine-pediatrics.

There are several reasons why medical students and residents choose a career in nephrology. They include interest in physiology, interest in practicing a non–procedure-based subspecialty, and others (1). A key factor in their decisions is related to positive experiences during their nephrology rotations that can be accomplished only by enthusiastic and satisfied fellows and practicing nephrologists (1).

There are several reasons why medical students and residents choose a career in nephrology. They include interest in physiology, interest in practicing a non–procedure-based subspecialty, and others (1). A key factor in their decisions is related to positive experiences during their nephrology rotations that can be accomplished only by enthusiastic and satisfied fellows and practicing nephrologists (1).

Detective Nephron

Detective Nephron, world-renowned for his expert analytic skills, trains budding physician-detectives in the diagnosis and treatment of kidney diseases. L.O. Henle, a budding nephrologist, presents a new case to the master consultant.