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It is well established that kidney transplantation is the treatment of choice for patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD), as this treatment modality has been shown to provide improved patient survival and quality of life compared with dialysis (1). In an ideal system, patients in need of a kidney transplant would receive one as soon as the need arises.

The numbers speak for themselves. There are currently 121,678 people waiting for life-saving organ transplants in the US. Of these, 100,791 await kidney transplants. A patient is added to the kidney waitlist every 14 minutes and 13 people die every day waiting for a kidney transplant (1).

Is it possible to turn unusable organs into transplantable organs? Ex vivo pulsatile machine perfusion of donor organs is a proven technique for superior organ preservation, reduced delayed graft function, and reduced ischemia-reperfusion injury. This has been the standard of care for over four decades in high-volume transplant centers.

Children with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) who undergo kidney transplantation are at high risk of recurrent disease and allograft failure. A new study provides insights into long-term posttransplant survival for this group of patients.

Older kidney recipients can benefit from organs from older donors. But previous cerebrovascular disease may reduce the survival benefits of these kidney transplants, according to a recent study.

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