Diabetes and Kidney Disease 2019: August Special Section

Capture_title_0.PNGDiabetes is the second most common cause of kidney failure in the United States. Diabetic Kidney Disease (DKD) encompasses structural and functional abnormalities involving the kidneys. Clinically, these changes result in hypertension, proteinuria, and progressive decline in kidney function, ultimately leading to ESKD. Diabetic kidney disease accounts for more than 40% of all ESKD In the United States. Therefore, regarding the progression of this particular form of kidney disease holds the key to reducing the incidence of ESKD and meeting one of the goals of the Advancing American Kidney Health initiative. In this issue of ASN Kidney News, we gathered a group of experts to address some of our latest understandings of this condition, particularly focusing on advances in treatment. Dr. Anders leads with the evolution of our understanding of the disease and gives an overview of renoprotective agents and their mechanisms to slow disease progression. Dr. Batuman focuses on the important landmark trials that have shaped our current knowledge. Drs. Argyropoulos, Alicic, Maqbool, and Cooper go into a bit of detail regarding novel anti-diabetic agents, namely: SGLT-2 inhibitors, GLP1 agonists, and DPP-4 inhibitors, respectively. Dr. Perkovic addresses ongoing and upcoming trials that will further elucidate safety and efficacy of these novel agents on cardiovascular and renal outcomes. Dr. Diamantidis reminds us that an old drug, metformin, still has an important role in the management of diabetes in this era. Last, Dr. Molitch gives us his perspective on how these novel agents fit with the current guidelines and how they may potentially shape future ones.

—Christos Argyropoulos, MD, PhD, FASN, and Edgar Lerma, MD, FASN, Editors

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Capture_title_0.PNGDiabetes is the second most common cause of kidney failure in the United States. Diabetic Kidney Disease (DKD) encompasses structural and functional abnormalities involving the kidneys. Clinically, these changes result in hypertension, proteinuria, and progressive decline in kidney function, ultimately leading to ESKD. Diabetic kidney disease accounts for more than 40% of all ESKD In the United States. Therefore, regarding the progression of this particular form of kidney disease holds the key to reducing the incidence of ESKD and meeting one of the goals of the Advancing American Kidney Health initiative. In this issue of ASN Kidney News, we gathered a group of experts to address some of our latest understandings of this condition, particularly focusing on advances in treatment. Dr. Anders leads with the evolution of our understanding of the disease and gives an overview of renoprotective agents and their mechanisms to slow disease progression. Dr. Batuman focuses on the important landmark trials that have shaped our current knowledge. Drs. Argyropoulos, Alicic, Maqbool, and Cooper go into a bit of detail regarding novel anti-diabetic agents, namely: SGLT-2 inhibitors, GLP1 agonists, and DPP-4 inhibitors, respectively. Dr. Perkovic addresses ongoing and upcoming trials that will further elucidate safety and efficacy of these novel agents on cardiovascular and renal outcomes. Dr. Diamantidis reminds us that an old drug, metformin, still has an important role in the management of diabetes in this era. Last, Dr. Molitch gives us his perspective on how these novel agents fit with the current guidelines and how they may potentially shape future ones.

—Christos Argyropoulos, MD, PhD, FASN, and Edgar Lerma, MD, FASN, Editors

Date:
Thursday, August 8, 2019