Perceived Racial Discrimination May Impact Kidney Function

Among 1574 adults with preserved kidney function, 20% perceived themselves to have been discriminated against because of their race. Such individuals were more likely to be African American and have a higher education, but they were more likely to be living in poverty. They also tended to have higher systolic blood pressure but a lower prevalence of diabetes. Perceived racial discrimination was linked with greater kidney function decline over 5 years of follow-up, but when analyzed by race and sex, the link remained only among African American women. The findings were presented at ASN Kidney Week 2014.

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Among 1574 adults with preserved kidney function, 20% perceived themselves to have been discriminated against because of their race. Such individuals were more likely to be African American and have a higher education, but they were more likely to be living in poverty. They also tended to have higher systolic blood pressure but a lower prevalence of diabetes. Perceived racial discrimination was linked with greater kidney function decline over 5 years of follow-up, but when analyzed by race and sex, the link remained only among African American women. The findings were presented at ASN Kidney Week 2014.