Insulin-Producing Cells Derived from Skin Normalize Blood Sugar Levels in Diabetic Mice

Investigators have reprogrammed human skin cells to create induced pluripotent stem cells, which were then coaxed into forming insulin-producing cells through the presence of pancreatic growth factors. When the differentiated cells were transplanted under the kidney capsules of diabetic immunodeficient mice, the animals’ blood sugar levels decreased to normal or near-normal levels over 150 days. In MRI analyses, a 3D organoid appeared as a white patch on the transplanted kidneys but not on control kidneys. The PLOS One findings provide evidence that induced pluripotent stem cells might be a novel option for the treatment of type 1 diabetes.

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Investigators have reprogrammed human skin cells to create induced pluripotent stem cells, which were then coaxed into forming insulin-producing cells through the presence of pancreatic growth factors. When the differentiated cells were transplanted under the kidney capsules of diabetic immunodeficient mice, the animals’ blood sugar levels decreased to normal or near-normal levels over 150 days. In MRI analyses, a 3D organoid appeared as a white patch on the transplanted kidneys but not on control kidneys. The PLOS One findings provide evidence that induced pluripotent stem cells might be a novel option for the treatment of type 1 diabetes.

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