Engineered Bacteria Reprogram Intestinal Cells into Insulin-Secreting Cells

When diabetic rats were fed a strain of lactobacillus (a type of bacteria found in the human gut) that was engineered to secrete glucagen-like peptide-1, the animals showed significant increases in insulin levels and were more glucose tolerant than animals fed the parent bacterial strain. The rats developed insulin-producing cells within the upper intestine in numbers sufficient to replace 25% to 33% of the insulin capacity of nondiabetic healthy rats. The Diabetes results provide evidence of the potential for a nonabsorbed oral treatment for diabetes involving bacteria.

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When diabetic rats were fed a strain of lactobacillus (a type of bacteria found in the human gut) that was engineered to secrete glucagen-like peptide-1, the animals showed significant increases in insulin levels and were more glucose tolerant than animals fed the parent bacterial strain. The rats developed insulin-producing cells within the upper intestine in numbers sufficient to replace 25% to 33% of the insulin capacity of nondiabetic healthy rats. The Diabetes results provide evidence of the potential for a nonabsorbed oral treatment for diabetes involving bacteria.

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