Drugs Used to Treat High BP May be Linked with Lower Alzheimer’s Risk

People genetically predisposed to have high systolic blood pressure may be at decreased risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In a recent study, investigators identified causal associations between potentially modifiable risk factors and AD risk by analyzing genetic data from 17,008 individuals with AD and 37,154 controls. People who were genetically predisposed to have high systolic blood pressure were at lower risk for developing Alzheimer's and were more likely to be using antihypertensive medications, which suggests that the use of these drugs rather than high blood pressure itself may be driving the association. The findings are published in PLOS Medicine.

 

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People genetically predisposed to have high systolic blood pressure may be at decreased risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In a recent study, investigators identified causal associations between potentially modifiable risk factors and AD risk by analyzing genetic data from 17,008 individuals with AD and 37,154 controls. People who were genetically predisposed to have high systolic blood pressure were at lower risk for developing Alzheimer's and were more likely to be using antihypertensive medications, which suggests that the use of these drugs rather than high blood pressure itself may be driving the association. The findings are published in PLOS Medicine.