New NephSAP Issue - "Acute Kidney Injury and Critical Care Nephrology"

By ASN Staff

NephSAP Volume 18, Number 2, May 2019

Please read the full issue.

Acute Kidney Injury and Critical Care Nephrology

Acute kidney injury, primarily caused by acute tubular necrosis, leads to significant morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients. AKI also increases the risk of progression of chronic kidney disease to end-stage kidney disease and affects other health resource outcomes such as length of stay and readmissions.

This issue of the Nephrology Self-Assessment Program (NephSAP) is based on a survey of the literature published from the Autumn of 2016 to the Autumn of 2018, we reviewed recent advances in the field through the perspective of prior studies. We did not provide a comprehensive review of all aspects of AKI. The reader is referred to prior issues of NephSAP and other sources for more detailed coverage of topics that are only briefly discussed in this issue or omitted because of few recent advances.

This issue also examines recent advances in critical care medicine that affect the care of patients with AKI and CKD. The intensive care unit has continued to be a locus for nephrology care, making it necessary for nephrologists to acknowledge and appreciate the rapidly evolving practice of critical care medicine. Although our critical care review is not encyclopedic, we have included important issues that nephrologists frequently will encounter when caring for critically ill patients and areas where new data have emerged over the past 24 months.

Learning Objectives

  1. Review recent advances in the prevention and treatment of AKI
  2. Discuss updates in the epidemiology of AKI and connections between AKI and CKD
  3. Describe the complex interplay between the heart and kidney in settings such as congestive heart failure and cardiac surgery
  4. Identify interactions between sepsis and kidney injury
  5. Discuss renal drug toxicity, including contrast nephropathy
  6. Analyze the evidence regarding optimal timing, dosage, and modality of RRT in AKI
  7. Distinguish differences between functional, biochemical, and electronic biomarkers of AKI and understand their use in clinical care
  8. Assess the impact of crystalloid selection on kidney injury and other adverse patient outcomes in the setting of critical illness
  9. Examine recent advances in non–renal aspects of critical care medicine that affect the management of patients with AKI and CKD
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NephSAP Volume 18, Number 2, May 2019

Please read the full issue.

Acute Kidney Injury and Critical Care Nephrology

Acute kidney injury, primarily caused by acute tubular necrosis, leads to significant morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients. AKI also increases the risk of progression of chronic kidney disease to end-stage kidney disease and affects other health resource outcomes such as length of stay and readmissions.

This issue of the Nephrology Self-Assessment Program (NephSAP) is based on a survey of the literature published from the Autumn of 2016 to the Autumn of 2018, we reviewed recent advances in the field through the perspective of prior studies. We did not provide a comprehensive review of all aspects of AKI. The reader is referred to prior issues of NephSAP and other sources for more detailed coverage of topics that are only briefly discussed in this issue or omitted because of few recent advances.

This issue also examines recent advances in critical care medicine that affect the care of patients with AKI and CKD. The intensive care unit has continued to be a locus for nephrology care, making it necessary for nephrologists to acknowledge and appreciate the rapidly evolving practice of critical care medicine. Although our critical care review is not encyclopedic, we have included important issues that nephrologists frequently will encounter when caring for critically ill patients and areas where new data have emerged over the past 24 months.

Learning Objectives

  1. Review recent advances in the prevention and treatment of AKI
  2. Discuss updates in the epidemiology of AKI and connections between AKI and CKD
  3. Describe the complex interplay between the heart and kidney in settings such as congestive heart failure and cardiac surgery
  4. Identify interactions between sepsis and kidney injury
  5. Discuss renal drug toxicity, including contrast nephropathy
  6. Analyze the evidence regarding optimal timing, dosage, and modality of RRT in AKI
  7. Distinguish differences between functional, biochemical, and electronic biomarkers of AKI and understand their use in clinical care
  8. Assess the impact of crystalloid selection on kidney injury and other adverse patient outcomes in the setting of critical illness
  9. Examine recent advances in non–renal aspects of critical care medicine that affect the management of patients with AKI and CKD
Date:
Wednesday, May 15, 2019