Electronic health records (EMRs) linked to stress and physician burnout

By ASN Staff

A study was recently published in the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association (JAMIA) entitled, Physician stress and burnout: the impact of health information technology. The study set out to quantify “how stress related to use of health information technology (HIT) predicts burnout among physicians” by measuring at least one “of the following: poor/marginal time for documentation, moderately high/excessive time spent on the electronic health record (EHR or EMR) at home, and agreement that using an HER adds to daily frustration. 4,197 practicing physicians in Rhode Island were surveyed in 2017.

The study found that 26% of the 1,792 respondents self-reported burnout. 91% were EHR users, and 70% of users “reported HIT-related stress, with the highest prevalence in primary care-oriented specialties”.1 Further conclusions found that doctors with insufficient time for electronic documentation at work had 2.8 times the odds of burnout symptoms compared to doctors that self-reported having enough time at work – pointing towards a strong possibility that they were completing this work at home, therefore interfering with their personal lives.

39.5 percent of general internists, 37% of family medicine physicians, 33.6% of pediatricians, and 36.4% of dermatologists reported all three symptoms of burnout the study was measuring.

Burnout remains prevalent in the medical profession as a recent poll from the Medical Group Management Association found that 73% of healthcare leaders felt at least some degree of burnout.2

For more information on the study, please visit the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association.


Resources

1. https://academic.oup.com/jamia/advance-article-abstract/doi/10.1093/jamia/ocy145/5230918?redirectedFrom=fulltext

2. https://www.mgma.com/resources/resources/human-resources/mgma-stat-poll-shows-majority-of-healthcare-leader

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A study was recently published in the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association (JAMIA) entitled, Physician stress and burnout: the impact of health information technology. The study set out to quantify “how stress related to use of health information technology (HIT) predicts burnout among physicians” by measuring at least one “of the following: poor/marginal time for documentation, moderately high/excessive time spent on the electronic health record (EHR or EMR) at home, and agreement that using an HER adds to daily frustration. 4,197 practicing physicians in Rhode Island were surveyed in 2017.

The study found that 26% of the 1,792 respondents self-reported burnout. 91% were EHR users, and 70% of users “reported HIT-related stress, with the highest prevalence in primary care-oriented specialties”.1 Further conclusions found that doctors with insufficient time for electronic documentation at work had 2.8 times the odds of burnout symptoms compared to doctors that self-reported having enough time at work – pointing towards a strong possibility that they were completing this work at home, therefore interfering with their personal lives.

39.5 percent of general internists, 37% of family medicine physicians, 33.6% of pediatricians, and 36.4% of dermatologists reported all three symptoms of burnout the study was measuring.

Burnout remains prevalent in the medical profession as a recent poll from the Medical Group Management Association found that 73% of healthcare leaders felt at least some degree of burnout.2

For more information on the study, please visit the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association.


Resources

1. https://academic.oup.com/jamia/advance-article-abstract/doi/10.1093/jamia/ocy145/5230918?redirectedFrom=fulltext

2. https://www.mgma.com/resources/resources/human-resources/mgma-stat-poll-shows-majority-of-healthcare-leader

Date:
Thursday, December 13, 2018