Comments and advice on how to read a journal’s rejection letter

By ASN Staff

September 28, 2017

Stephen Heard, an evolutionary ecologist and entomologist at the University of New Brunswick and previously faculty at the University of Iowa, recently published a short blog detailing how best to read and react to a rejection letter after submitting your work to a journal.

His insights are worthwhile and makes for good advice when confronted with a rejection, including:

- “…it’s true that a rejection letter closes the door for your manuscript at Journal X. But this is a delay, not the end of the story, for your manuscript: nearly every rejected manuscript finds a new home in some form”.

- “Think twice, and set yourself a high bar to convince yourself, before concluding that a criticism is mistaken”.

- “… do not write the snappy comeback that you so very much want to write. Put the rejection away for a couple of days, and then read it again with a little more perspective”.

Click here to read the full blog.

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Stephen Heard, an evolutionary ecologist and entomologist at the University of New Brunswick and previously faculty at the University of Iowa, recently published a short blog detailing how best to read and react to a rejection letter after submitting your work to a journal.

His insights are worthwhile and makes for good advice when confronted with a rejection, including:

- “…it’s true that a rejection letter closes the door for your manuscript at Journal X. But this is a delay, not the end of the story, for your manuscript: nearly every rejected manuscript finds a new home in some form”.

- “Think twice, and set yourself a high bar to convince yourself, before concluding that a criticism is mistaken”.

- “… do not write the snappy comeback that you so very much want to write. Put the rejection away for a couple of days, and then read it again with a little more perspective”.

Click here to read the full blog.

Date:
Thursday, September 28, 2017