Yale leads largest-ever collaboration to educate health workers in Rwanda

By ASN Staff

yale news.PNG“[In] 2012, Yale and other academic medical centers in the United States joined with the Rwandan Ministry of Health’s Human Resources for Health Program (HRH) to strengthen the country’s medical resources and increase the quantity and quality of its workforce. The HRH —a seven-year training program focused on medicine, nursing, dentistry, and health management — is led by the government of Rwanda and funded by the U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief through the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria.

This is the largest single collaboration in health workforce education to be funded by the United States,” said Dr. Asghar Rastegar, director of the Office of Global Health at the Yale School of Medicine. “It demonstrates how we can bring our knowledge and capacity to bear to improve medical training and health care in the developing world.”

Dr. Grace Igiraneza is a beneficiary of this program as she receives training at Yale New Haven Hospital with the nephrology team.

“Later this year, when she returns to her post as head of dialysis at a teaching hospital in Kigali, Rwanda’s capital, she expects that her skills will lead to improved care for patients and better training for Rwandan residents. “I needed more training to lead that service,” she said. “It is my obligation to give back what I have been given.

I am grateful for the partnership between Yale and the University of Rwanda and the University Teaching Hospital of Kigali and the global health program at Yale,” she said. “Through them I have been able to come here and learn. When I go back I will be able to help Rwandans and offer a standard of care in nephrology.”

Please read the full article at Yale News.

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yale news.PNG“[In] 2012, Yale and other academic medical centers in the United States joined with the Rwandan Ministry of Health’s Human Resources for Health Program (HRH) to strengthen the country’s medical resources and increase the quantity and quality of its workforce. The HRH —a seven-year training program focused on medicine, nursing, dentistry, and health management — is led by the government of Rwanda and funded by the U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief through the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria.

This is the largest single collaboration in health workforce education to be funded by the United States,” said Dr. Asghar Rastegar, director of the Office of Global Health at the Yale School of Medicine. “It demonstrates how we can bring our knowledge and capacity to bear to improve medical training and health care in the developing world.”

Dr. Grace Igiraneza is a beneficiary of this program as she receives training at Yale New Haven Hospital with the nephrology team.

“Later this year, when she returns to her post as head of dialysis at a teaching hospital in Kigali, Rwanda’s capital, she expects that her skills will lead to improved care for patients and better training for Rwandan residents. “I needed more training to lead that service,” she said. “It is my obligation to give back what I have been given.

I am grateful for the partnership between Yale and the University of Rwanda and the University Teaching Hospital of Kigali and the global health program at Yale,” she said. “Through them I have been able to come here and learn. When I go back I will be able to help Rwandans and offer a standard of care in nephrology.”

Please read the full article at Yale News.

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Date:
Thursday, February 22, 2018