Study from UAB: acute kidney injury and kidney-resident macrophages

By ASN Staff

“Resident macrophages reprogram toward a developmental state after acute kidney injury” was published today, January 24th, in JCI Insight. The study with co-first authors and trainees in the NIH-funded UAB Medical Scientist Training Program, Jeremie M. Lever and Travis D. Hull, M.D., Ph.D., found that “during acute kidney injury (AKI) in a mouse model, kidney-resident macrophages are reprogrammed to a developmental state, resembling these same cells when they are found in newborn mice. UAB News stated that “this reprogramming during AKI may be important to promote healing and tissue regeneration. If a similar developmental shift is seen for human kidney-resident machrophages during AKI, that could aid new therapeutic approaches for patients”.

Lever stated that “[m]acrophage biology has reached a pivotal point… [that] in order to successfully utilize these cells for contemporary translational interventions, I believe we will need to be specific about the origin – tissue-resident versus infiltrative – of the cells we plan to target” Hull, the other co-first author, said that “this is an exciting development in the field of acute kidney injury… but also may represent a therapeutic target in fields such as transplantation, where the importance of macrophage biology is less well understood”.

The research was lead by James George, Ph.D, professor in the UAB Department of Surgery and Anupam Agarwal, M.D., director of the Division of Nephrology in the UAB Department of Medicine and current American Society of Nephrology president-elect for 2020.

For more information on the study, please see the UAB News article or the JCI Insight study.

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“Resident macrophages reprogram toward a developmental state after acute kidney injury” was published today, January 24th, in JCI Insight. The study with co-first authors and trainees in the NIH-funded UAB Medical Scientist Training Program, Jeremie M. Lever and Travis D. Hull, M.D., Ph.D., found that “during acute kidney injury (AKI) in a mouse model, kidney-resident macrophages are reprogrammed to a developmental state, resembling these same cells when they are found in newborn mice. UAB News stated that “this reprogramming during AKI may be important to promote healing and tissue regeneration. If a similar developmental shift is seen for human kidney-resident machrophages during AKI, that could aid new therapeutic approaches for patients”.

Lever stated that “[m]acrophage biology has reached a pivotal point… [that] in order to successfully utilize these cells for contemporary translational interventions, I believe we will need to be specific about the origin – tissue-resident versus infiltrative – of the cells we plan to target” Hull, the other co-first author, said that “this is an exciting development in the field of acute kidney injury… but also may represent a therapeutic target in fields such as transplantation, where the importance of macrophage biology is less well understood”.

The research was lead by James George, Ph.D, professor in the UAB Department of Surgery and Anupam Agarwal, M.D., director of the Division of Nephrology in the UAB Department of Medicine and current American Society of Nephrology president-elect for 2020.

For more information on the study, please see the UAB News article or the JCI Insight study.

Date:
Thursday, January 24, 2019