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Meera P. Suthar

The role of advanced practice providers (APPs) has evolved over the last few decades, with data showing that APPs in nephrology can directly improve kidney outcomes in patients with chronic kidney disease (1). The population of kidney transplant recipients (KTRs) in the United States is growing annually, and in 2021, the United Network for Organ Sharing reported the largest number of organ transplants completed in a single year (2). With the exception of 2020, which was affected due to the COVID-19 pandemic, kidney transplants have increased 8 consecutive years in a row (3) (

Meera P. Suthar

The role of advanced practice providers (APPs) has evolved over the last few decades, with data showing that APPs in nephrology can directly improve kidney outcomes in patients with chronic kidney disease (1). The population of kidney transplant recipients (KTRs) in the United States is growing annually, and in 2021, the United Network for Organ Sharing reported the largest number of organ transplants completed in a single year (2). With the exception of 2020, which was affected due to the COVID-19 pandemic, kidney transplants have increased 8 consecutive years in a row (3) (

Fatima Ali, Mital Jhaveri, and Sheila Sarnoski-Brocavich
Is atrial fibrillation (AF) in patients on dialysis an actual effector of cardioembolic events, or is it a surrogate marker for cardiovascular disease?

Overall, direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) have a superior benefit to a risk profile compared with vitamin K antagonists (VKAs), such as warfarin. When it comes to patients on hemodialysis (HD), however, the confusion lies in which, if any, anticoagulants are appropriate. Patients receiving maintenance HD have a high incidence of stroke, which typically warrants the use of anticoagulation. However, patients on HD also have an increased risk of bleeding because they are routinely heparinized three times each

Fatima Ali, Mital Jhaveri, and Sheila Sarnoski-Brocavich
Is atrial fibrillation (AF) in patients on dialysis an actual effector of cardioembolic events, or is it a surrogate marker for cardiovascular disease?

Overall, direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) have a superior benefit to a risk profile compared with vitamin K antagonists (VKAs), such as warfarin. When it comes to patients on hemodialysis (HD), however, the confusion lies in which, if any, anticoagulants are appropriate. Patients receiving maintenance HD have a high incidence of stroke, which typically warrants the use of anticoagulation. However, patients on HD also have an increased risk of bleeding because they are routinely heparinized three times each

Linda Awdishu

Pharmacists are essential drug experts on the health care team, providing clinical services related to safe distribution, optimal selection, and use of medications and patient education in the community, ambulatory care, and acute care pharmacy environments.

Pharmacists are trained at accredited schools of pharmacy that require a minimum of 2–4 years of undergraduate education before entering a 3- to 4-year doctorate training program (PharmD). During their doctorate training, they are licensed as pharmacy interns and begin gaining practice experience in the community and acute care settings, working under the supervision of a licensed pharmacist. After completing the PharmD degree, although

Linda Awdishu

Pharmacists are essential drug experts on the health care team, providing clinical services related to safe distribution, optimal selection, and use of medications and patient education in the community, ambulatory care, and acute care pharmacy environments.

Pharmacists are trained at accredited schools of pharmacy that require a minimum of 2–4 years of undergraduate education before entering a 3- to 4-year doctorate training program (PharmD). During their doctorate training, they are licensed as pharmacy interns and begin gaining practice experience in the community and acute care settings, working under the supervision of a licensed pharmacist. After completing the PharmD degree, although

Candice Halinski

The suboptimal outcomes experienced by patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are a direct result of flaws in the design of the health care delivery model. This is evidenced by lack of pre-existing nephrology care, high rates of dialysis initiation using a central venous catheter, increased morbidity and mortality, and low rates of preemptive transplantation (1). Improvement on the associated outcomes can be facilitated by the creation and deployment of supportive interdisciplinary care delivery models.

Under the Advancing American Kidney Health initiative, ambitious targets have been identified to improve on the care delivery model for patients with kidney

Kathleen Mallett and Sofia Thomas

The COVID-19 pandemic has been a catalyst for burnout in a strained health care workforce, especially in the emergency medicine and critical care sectors (1). The Association of American Medical Colleges projects a shortage of up to 139,000 physicians by 2033 (2). Burnout has contributed significantly to the “Great Resignation,” with a tremendous short-term impact on the US health care system, prompting the US Surgeon General to prioritize this crisis (2). It is difficult, however, to understand the long-term implications of this exodus (3), especially in nephrology.

Nephrologist burnout

Multiple factors have

Kathleen Mallett and Sofia Thomas

The COVID-19 pandemic has been a catalyst for burnout in a strained health care workforce, especially in the emergency medicine and critical care sectors (1). The Association of American Medical Colleges projects a shortage of up to 139,000 physicians by 2033 (2). Burnout has contributed significantly to the “Great Resignation,” with a tremendous short-term impact on the US health care system, prompting the US Surgeon General to prioritize this crisis (2). It is difficult, however, to understand the long-term implications of this exodus (3), especially in nephrology.

Nephrologist burnout

Multiple factors have

Kathleen Mallett and Sofia Thomas

The COVID-19 pandemic has been a catalyst for burnout in a strained health care workforce, especially in the emergency medicine and critical care sectors (1). The Association of American Medical Colleges projects a shortage of up to 139,000 physicians by 2033 (2). Burnout has contributed significantly to the “Great Resignation,” with a tremendous short-term impact on the US health care system, prompting the US Surgeon General to prioritize this crisis (2). It is difficult, however, to understand the long-term implications of this exodus (3), especially in nephrology.

Nephrologist burnout

Multiple factors have