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ASN Staff

The ISN Global Kidney Health Atlas gathers “data to determine the world status of existing resources, structures and organizations available to patients with CKD and AKI”. The Atlas “is designed to document the degree to which the six principles of Universal Health Coverage (Health Finance, Health Policy, Service Delivery and Safety, Essential Medications and Health Products, Health Information and Statistics, and Health Workforce) are available in each county or region”.

David White

Please see a statement on the below exchange from ASN President Mark Rosenberg. 

 

In a potentially game-changing exchange yesterday at a House Appropriations subcommittee hearing, Health and Human Services (HHS) Secretary Alex M. Azar, II, stated that a preliminary HHS Office of the Actuary analysis indicates that the savings generated by averting dialysis would be greater than the cost required to extend coverage for immunosuppressant drugs.  While noting that any potential savings would be “specific to the design of any actual policy,” the secretary underscored that HHS is “very focused on ways we can incentivize toward transplantation.”

ASN Staff

In a joint press release in June 2018, the American Society of Nephrology (ASN), the European Renal Association – European Dialysis and Transplant Association (ERA-EDTA), and the International Society of Nephrology (ISN), publicized that the current number of people who suffer from kidney diseases worldwide has reached over 850 million and it's time to raise awareness for action to help alleviate the epidemic.

ASN Staff

Outlined in a recent report from CNBC by Lori Ioannous (@Loriloannou1 ), chronic kidney disease is a “modern-day plague in the United States, driven in large part by the nation’s obesity epidemic”. 30 million Americans, or 1 in 9 adults, have chronic kidney disease, with diabetes and hypertension being major causes. “More than 510,000 kidney patients are now on dialysis, and over 100,000 are on the kidney transplant list”.

David White

In a bold move up the ladder of electronic health record (EHR) interoperability, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and the Office of National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC) released two proposed rules February 11 designed to allow patients access to their own records and data – particularly via apps – and provide strong deterrents to those who would block data.

Ryan Murray

The All of Us Research Program, a groundbreaking research effort funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH), has officially enrolled over 100,000 core participants. The effort looks to collect data from one million individuals on their health, habits and location to look for patterns that may affects one’s health with the goal of accelerating research and developing personalized and highly effective health care.

David White

The American Society of Nephrology (ASN) submitted comments to Medicare on its Medicare Advantage and Part D Drug Pricing Proposed Rule on January 25.  ASN objected to segments of the proposed rule that remove protections from the “six protected classes of drugs” in Medicare Part D. Specifically, ASN objected to proposals to:

ASN Staff

“Resident macrophages reprogram toward a developmental state after acute kidney injury” was published today, January 24th, in JCI Insight. The study with co-first authors and trainees in the NIH-funded UAB Medical Scientist Training Program, Jeremie M. Lever and Travis D. Hull, M.D., Ph.D., found that “during acute kidney injury (AKI) in a mouse model, kidney-resident macrophages are reprogrammed to a developmental state, resembling these same cells when they are found in newborn mice. UAB News stated that “this reprogramming during AKI may be important to promote healing and tissue regeneration. If a similar developmental shift is seen for human kidney-resident machrophages during AKI, that could aid new therapeutic approaches for patients”.

ASN Staff

“Exome sequencing in a cohort of over 3,000 patients demonstrated genetic causes of chronic kidney disease in about 10% of cases and genetic testing may aid in the treatment of these patients”.

The study, which was conducted with funds by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and others, incorporated 3,307 patients over the age of 21, and 1,179 (35.6%) were of self-identified non-European ancestry. They “detected diagnostic variants in 307 of the 3,315 patients (9.3%), encompassing 66 different monogenic disorders. Of the disorders detected, 39 (59%) were found in only a single patient. Diagnostic variants were detected across all clinically defined categories, including congenital or cystic renal disease (127 of 531 patients [23.9%]) and nephropathy of unknown origin (48 of 281 patients [17.1%]). Of the 2,187 patients assessed, 34 (1.6%) had genetic findings for medically actionable disorders that, although unrelated to their nephropathy, would also lead to subspecialty referral and inform renal management”.

Marcello Tonelli MD SM MSc

tonelli.jpgA recent study was published online in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) entitled “Comparison of the Complexity of Patients Seen by Different Medical Subspecialists in a Universal Health Care System” on November 30, 2018.

Please access the abstract and full report on the JAMA website.