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With increasing uncertainties around variants of the COVID-19 virus, Kidney Week 2021 will now be a fully virtual meeting. Kidney Week is the world’s largest and most dynamic meeting of kidney professionals, where participants share their work, learn about the latest advances in the field, develop new collaborations, and listen to provocative exchanges between leading experts.

ASN is accepting late-breaking clinical trials through September 1 for Kidney Week 2021, which will include virtual content and an in-person annual meeting from November 4th to 7th in San Diego, CA.

Anupam Agarwal MD FASN

Welcome to ASN Kidney Week Reimagined for 2020! 

On behalf of our society, I thank each one of you for your unwavering commitment to improving kidney health throughout the world. This first-ever Kidney Week Reimagined symbolizes many of the opportunities and challenges nephrology faces. Your participation during these unparalleled and supremely challenging times is so highly valued and greatly appreciated.

ASN honors the 2020 Midcareer Award recipients. ASN congratulates the following individuals for their exemplary work and achievements.

Derek M. Fine, MD, and Vandana Dua Niyyar, MD, FASN, will receive the ASN Distinguished Clinical Service Award, which recognizes individuals who combine the art of medicine with the skills demanded by the scientific body of knowledge in service to patients. The award also recognizes those who exemplify leadership and excellence in the practice of nephrology and those who have initiated or been involved in volunteer programs or have provided volunteer service post-training.

ASN Staff

Kidney Week On-Demand 2019 is now available! The site provides recordings and presentation slides from the 2019 ASN Annual Meeting in Washington, DC.

If you were unable to attend or missed a session, now is your chance to access approximately 220 hours of recorded presentations with Kidney Week On-Demand!

ASN Staff

WASHINGTON, DC – Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a rare but morbid complication of pregnancy, presenters said during Kidney Week 2019. Cases are rising in developed countries including the U.S., though, and understanding anatomic and physiologic changes is critical to understanding the diagnosis.

The number of obstetric AKI cases in the U.S. is on the increase, said Vesna D. Garovic, MD, PhD, a nephrologist with the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. A study1 of 11 million deliveries found these cases rose from 2.4 per 10,000 pregnancies in 1999-2001 to 6.3 per 10,000 pregnancies in 2010-2011, at a 10% yearly increase.

David White

Focusing on the intensity of the executive branch’s sweeping proposals to radically change kidney care – and the transformational implications therein – the plenary session on November 9 at Kidney Week was far from ordinary. The State-of-the Art Lecture, “Perspectives on Innovation and Transformation in Kidney Care,” served as a crucible to distill down what should, and must, happen at this point to deliver a brighter future for people with kidney diseases.

Karen Blum

WASHINGTON, DC – Air pollution, water pollutants, and global warming are among the environmental factors contributing to the development of kidney disease, according to a presenter at Kidney Week 2019.

The evidence is strongest for air pollution, said Ziyad Al-Aly, MD, FASN, chief of research and education for the Department of Veterans Affairs Health Care System in St. Louis. Fine particles of air pollutants less than 2.5 micrometers in diameter—about 1/20th the width of a human hair—can get into the capillaries when inhaled and exert effects on the body, he said. Common sources of such PM2.5 air pollution include land traffic (cars and trucks), power generation, residential energy, and biomass burning, as well as natural sources, such as forest fires.

Karen Blum

WASHINGTON, DC – Kidney transplant recipients have an imbalance of gut bacteria marked by a lower diversity of organisms and increased levels of Proteobacteriae such as Escherichia coli compared with healthy renal donors, according to new research presented at Kidney Week 2019.

The study, comparing composition of the gut microbiome in 139 renal transplant recipients and 105 healthy donors, found over 195 significant differences throughout the taxonomy, said lead author J.C. Swarte, PhD, of University Medical Centre Groningen in the Netherlands (Abstract SA-OR103). This included 37 significant differences at the genus level and 135 significant differences at the species level. Recipients who had diarrhea (n=28) had even lower gut diversity.

ASN Staff

WASHINGTON, DC – Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a rare but morbid complication of pregnancy, presenters said during Kidney Week 2019. Yet, cases are rising in developed countries, including the U.S., and understanding anatomic and physiologic changes is critical to understanding the diagnosis.

“The number of obstetric AKI cases in the U.S. is on the increase,” said Vesna D. Garovic, MD, PhD, a nephrologist with the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. A study1 of 11 million deliveries found these cases rose from 2.4 per 10,000 pregnancies in 1999-2001 to 6.3 per 10,000 pregnancies in 2010-2011, at a 10% yearly increase.