Browse

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 98 items for :

  • Clinical Care x
  • Refine by Content Type: All x
Clear All Modify Search

Priority #4: ACHIEVE EQUITY and eliminate disparities. Health disparities and the incidence of kidney diseases are undoubtedly connected. We need to address disparities and achieve equity not just in kidney care, but in health care overall.

A team of surgeons at NYU Langone Health in New York have transplanted a pig kidney into a human patient without triggering immediate rejection by the recipient’s immune system.

Priority #2: TRANSFORM TRANSPLANT and increase access to donor kidneys. If patients understood the benefits of transplantation and the process involved, more would likely accept the opportunity and pursue transplant listing.

In a joint statement, the American Society of Nephrology (ASN) and the National Kidney Foundation (NKF) commended the NKF-ASN Task Force on Reassessing the Inclusion of Race in Diagnosing Kidney Diseases for submitting its final report for publication. 

ASN applauds the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for amending the emergency use authorizations for both the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 Vaccine and the Moderna COVID-19 Vaccine to allow for the use of an additional dose in certain immunocompromised individuals, including kidney transplant recipients. 

Investigators discovered that kidney failure symptoms tended to increase or remain unchanged between transplant evaluation and transplantation; however, three months after transplantation, 9 of 11 symptoms lessened.

In the podcast, Bignall discusses the importance of a systems-based approach in addressing racial injustices that impact patient care, and how this approach is essential in addressing broader injustices, such as poverty, income inequality, and environmental conditions.

Reaffirming that race is a social, not a biological, construct, ASN remains committed to ensuring that racial and ethnic biases do not affect the diagnosis and treatment of kidney diseases.

Nephrology, more than any other specialty in medicine, was built on innovation. The artificial kidney-imagined, invented, and implemented by pioneers in our field-is nothing short of miraculous. In 1972, the US Congress changed federal policy to guarantee renal replacement therapy to anyone with kidney failure. With this change, dialysis "death panels" were disbanded.

Almost 50 years after the dialysis law was enacted, nephrology has taken the lead once again.

ASN continues to move forward on its commitment to dismantle systemic racism in nephrology. These are complex issues that can limit the ability of nephrologists and kidney health professionals to provide optimal care to patients or to reach their full career potential.