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Jennifer Branch

I have been fortunate to work in the field of nephrology my entire career, mostly as a registered nurse for the first 20 years and now as an advanced practice provider over the past 3 years. I currently serve as an inpatient nurse practitioner in transplantation at an academic health system. For the first 2 years, I also had experience in outpatient clinics and dialysis units.

Outpatient clinic experience

Seeing patients on an outpatient basis during my outpatient clinic experience allowed me to review labs, medications, and health issues with many minutes of teaching while completing a full examination. Health

Candice Halinski

Originally trained to provide holistic primary care, nurse practitioners (NPs) practice in a variety of acute and chronic care settings. The pathway to practice requires candidates to pursue multiple educational prerequisites and degrees (Figure 1). These rigorous demands are likely to increase in the coming years. Education and training begins with the completion of baseline prerequisites in addition to the attainment of a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) and active licensure as a registered nurse (RN) in the state of practice. State licensure requires that candidates successfully pass a board certification examination formally known as the National

Candice Halinski

Originally trained to provide holistic primary care, nurse practitioners (NPs) practice in a variety of acute and chronic care settings. The pathway to practice requires candidates to pursue multiple educational prerequisites and degrees (Figure 1). These rigorous demands are likely to increase in the coming years. Education and training begins with the completion of baseline prerequisites in addition to the attainment of a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) and active licensure as a registered nurse (RN) in the state of practice. State licensure requires that candidates successfully pass a board certification examination formally known as the National

Umut Selamet and Naoka Murakami

Amyloid light chain (AL) amyloidosis is a systemic disease affecting multiple organs, including the kidney, heart, gastrointestinal tract, and nerves. Kidney involvement is common and seen in ~70% of patients with newly diagnosed AL amyloidosis. Proteinuria >5 g/day and estimated glomerular filtration rate <50 mL/min at the time of diagnosis predict 60%–85% progression to end stage kidney disease (ESKD) in 3 years (1). The survival of patients with AL amyloidosis improved significantly over the past several decades, owing to advancements of treatment options with plasma cell-targeted therapies and hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) (2). Overall survival

Kim Zuber and Dale Gomez

Physician assistants (PAs) are licensed clinicians, trained in the medical model, who practice medicine in every specialty, setting, and state. They are dedicated to expanding access to care and transforming health through patient-centered, team-based medical practice, and as such, nephrology is a perfect home. In 1997, a cohort of nephrology PAs, under the auspices of the American Academy of Physician Associates, created a specialty organization—American Academy of Nephrology PAs (AANPA)—for all facets of nephrology PAs (e.g., office, dialysis, transplant, and intensive care unit). In 2020, of <148,000 PAs in the United States working in 70 medical and surgical subspecialties, only

Kim Zuber and Dale Gomez

Physician assistants (PAs) are licensed clinicians, trained in the medical model, who practice medicine in every specialty, setting, and state. They are dedicated to expanding access to care and transforming health through patient-centered, team-based medical practice, and as such, nephrology is a perfect home. In 1997, a cohort of nephrology PAs, under the auspices of the American Academy of Physician Associates, created a specialty organization—American Academy of Nephrology PAs (AANPA)—for all facets of nephrology PAs (e.g., office, dialysis, transplant, and intensive care unit). In 2020, of <148,000 PAs in the United States working in 70 medical and surgical subspecialties, only

Sara Krome

Physician assistants (PAs) have been colleague providers in health care since the late 1960s (1). PAs are trained at accredited PA programs across the country in the “medical” model of instruction, in contrast to nurse practitioners trained by the nursing instruction model (2). Most PA programs offer graduate-level education, with a degree such as Master of Health Science or Master of Physician Assistant Studies. A few programs remain that offer PA degrees or certificates at the baccalaureate level. Most graduate programs are 27 months (3). PAs are not required to and do not routinely

On September 28, advocates from patient and professional kidney health organizations from across the nation will call on their members of Congress to pass the Living Donor Protection Act (LDPA) as part of Kidney Community Advocacy Day 2022.

Momentum to pass the LDPA has been building steadily this year due to the efforts of advocates, including ASN's March 2022 Kidney Health Advocacy Day. The current draft of the legislation continues to add co-sponsors, bringing the total to 134 co-sponsors in the House and 41 in the Senate, the highest number of co-sponsors ever received by the legislation.

The LDPA was

The Senate Finance Committee raised numerous allegations of mismanagement, resistance to oversight, and poor performance against the leadership of the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) in a hearing held Wednesday, August 3, 2022. According to the committee, these allegations are part of a broader pattern of failure from UNOS—the current federal contractor managing the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network (OPTN)—that has claimed lives and thousands of discarded organs, including one in every four donated kidneys.

ASN has advocated for numerous improvements to the transplant system, with the goal of “transforming transplant,” as outlined in the We’re United 4 Kidney

Summer Dyer and Linda Awdishu

Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end stage kidney disease have complex medication regimens and multiple comorbidities and can take in excess of 12 medications daily (1). High pill burden and multiple care providers place CKD and dialysis patients at risk for medication-related problems (MRPs). It has been shown that for every $1 spent on detecting and addressing MRPs in the dialysis population, $4 may be saved by the health care system (2). The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) now requires monthly medication reconciliation in the End-Stage Renal Disease Quality Incentive Program (ESRD