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Among this year's professionals in the kidney community who have passed away, four deceased kidney disease leaders are acknowledged here for their contributions to nephrology. Nancy Spaeth, considered the longest surviving kidney patient in the world; Christopher Blagg, MD, a persistent advocate for dialysis; Dale Singer, MHA, an elegant force and knowledgeable executive; and Jerry Yee, MD, FASN, a generous mentor, have all been seminal figures in the field.

Nancy Spaeth

A fateful decision in 1966 by the Seattle Artificial Kidney Center's Admissions and Policy Committee to allow Nancy Spaeth to begin dialysis likely changed the course of her life.

Eric Seaborg

The National Board of Physicians and Surgeons (NBPAS) apparently received another boost toward wider acceptance of its recertification program when The Joint Commission added the organization to its list of “designated equivalent source agencies” in its accreditation manuals.

The NBPAS was founded in 2015 in reaction to what its founders saw as the expensive and onerous maintenance of certification requirements of the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) and the American Osteopathic Association. The NBPAS process is designed to provide “physicians with a choice in board recertification that is clinically rigorous, evidence-based, less burdensome, and nationally accepted,” according to its

Susan E. Quaggin

A silent public health crisis, kidney diseases affect approximately 10% of all Americans, or 37 million people. In addition to the burden of kidney diseases, management of patients with acute or chronic kidney diseases is complex and requires a dedicated team of experts to achieve the best possible outcomes.

In this month's ASN Kidney News, a series of articles highlight the key and evolving roles of advanced practice providers (APPs)—nurse practitioners (NPs) and physician associates (PAs; also called physician assistants)—as well as pharmacists, who are invaluable members of the kidney care team. The articles discuss career paths to

ASN Kidney News—the kidney community's leading newsmagazine— invites you to apply to be a KN Editorial Fellow.

Who can apply? Fellows entering their second, third, or fourth year of fellowship in nephrology with an interest in clinical nephrology, transplantation, basic research (physiology, pharmacology, or pathophysiology), or clinical research (observational research and clinical trials).

ASN Kidney News embraces diversity and equal opportunity. We are committed to building an inclusive culture that represents the diverse backgrounds, perspectives, and skills of the communities we serve globally.

How long is the appointment? Two years.

What are

Lesley C. Dinwiddie

First, let me congratulate you on yet another patient-centered edition. The June 2022 article No Filters: Assessing Physician Communication When Discussing Conservative Management of Kidney Failure by Drs. Corona and Koncicki (1) is timely, well researched, and to the point. It should become a “must read” for the entire nephrology community, especially those treating patients with advanced CKD [chronic kidney disease] and ESKD [end stage kidney disease].

Palliative care and conservative management have always seemed to be an “afterthought” or consigned to “other options” instead of being as vital a consideration as any of the forms of kidney

Lisa Koester

In 1972, nearly 40% of all patients on dialysis in the United States were on home dialysis. The next year, the Medicare End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Program began, and as a result, the use of home dialysis decreased dramatically. Over the years that have followed the establishment of the Medicare ESRD Program, there has been a resurgence of home dialysis, and research demonstrates that more frequent dialysis has better health outcomes than dialysis administered three times per week (1). U.S. Renal Data System (USRDS) data from 2019 reveal that 13.1% of prevalent patients with end stage kidney

Lisa Koester

In 1972, nearly 40% of all patients on dialysis in the United States were on home dialysis. The next year, the Medicare End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Program began, and as a result, the use of home dialysis decreased dramatically. Over the years that have followed the establishment of the Medicare ESRD Program, there has been a resurgence of home dialysis, and research demonstrates that more frequent dialysis has better health outcomes than dialysis administered three times per week (1). U.S. Renal Data System (USRDS) data from 2019 reveal that 13.1% of prevalent patients with end stage kidney

Jane Davis and Kim Zuber

In 1965, on opposite sides of the country, two revolutions in health care took place. In North Carolina, corpsmen returning from the Vietnam conflict put their skills and training to use in the newly formed profession: physician assistant (PA) (1, 2). In Colorado, registered nurses received postgraduate education, enabling them to provide health care in rural communities as nurse practitioners (NPs) (3). Both professions were formed to fill the need created simultaneously by a physician shortage and the increased numbers of patients eligible for health care under Medicare legislation (4). In 2021,

Jane Davis and Kim Zuber

In 1965, on opposite sides of the country, two revolutions in health care took place. In North Carolina, corpsmen returning from the Vietnam conflict put their skills and training to use in the newly formed profession: physician assistant (PA) (1, 2). In Colorado, registered nurses received postgraduate education, enabling them to provide health care in rural communities as nurse practitioners (NPs) (3). Both professions were formed to fill the need created simultaneously by a physician shortage and the increased numbers of patients eligible for health care under Medicare legislation (4). In 2021,

Jennifer Branch

I have been fortunate to work in the field of nephrology my entire career, mostly as a registered nurse for the first 20 years and now as an advanced practice provider over the past 3 years. I currently serve as an inpatient nurse practitioner in transplantation at an academic health system. For the first 2 years, I also had experience in outpatient clinics and dialysis units.

Outpatient clinic experience

Seeing patients on an outpatient basis during my outpatient clinic experience allowed me to review labs, medications, and health issues with many minutes of teaching while completing a full examination. Health