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In a joint statement, the American Society of Nephrology (ASN) and the National Kidney Foundation (NKF) commended the NKF-ASN Task Force on Reassessing the Inclusion of Race in Diagnosing Kidney Diseases for submitting its final report for publication. 

ASN applauds the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for amending the emergency use authorizations for both the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 Vaccine and the Moderna COVID-19 Vaccine to allow for the use of an additional dose in certain immunocompromised individuals, including kidney transplant recipients. 

Investigators discovered that kidney failure symptoms tended to increase or remain unchanged between transplant evaluation and transplantation; however, three months after transplantation, 9 of 11 symptoms lessened.

In the podcast, Bignall discusses the importance of a systems-based approach in addressing racial injustices that impact patient care, and how this approach is essential in addressing broader injustices, such as poverty, income inequality, and environmental conditions.

Reaffirming that race is a social, not a biological, construct, ASN remains committed to ensuring that racial and ethnic biases do not affect the diagnosis and treatment of kidney diseases.

Nephrology, more than any other specialty in medicine, was built on innovation. The artificial kidney-imagined, invented, and implemented by pioneers in our field-is nothing short of miraculous. In 1972, the US Congress changed federal policy to guarantee renal replacement therapy to anyone with kidney failure. With this change, dialysis "death panels" were disbanded.

Almost 50 years after the dialysis law was enacted, nephrology has taken the lead once again.

ASN continues to move forward on its commitment to dismantle systemic racism in nephrology. These are complex issues that can limit the ability of nephrologists and kidney health professionals to provide optimal care to patients or to reach their full career potential.

In response to a Request for Information (RFI), ASN recently submitted comments to the National Institutes of Health (NIH) with input from the ASN Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Committee, the ASN Health Care Justice Committee, and the ASN Policy and Advocacy Committee.

Last month, ASN and NKF asserted that race should not be included in kidney function estimating equations and that a suitable approach be put in its place that is accurate; representative for all regardless of race, ethnicity, age, or sex; not differentially produce bias, inaccuracy, or inequalities; and be standardized across the United States. Producing such a national standard depends on coordinating efforts to replace the existing equations for estimating kidney function with a suitable approach.

Today, the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (JASN) and the American Journal of Kidney Diseases (AJKD) published the interim report of the NKF-ASN Task Force on Reassessing the Inclusion of Race in Diagnosing Kidney Disease.

Kidney transplantation saves lives. For many people with kidney failure, transplant offers longer survival, greater quality of life, and lower associated costs compared to dialysis.