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Priya Yenebere and Amy A. Yau

There is increasing evidence that climate change is associated with kidney diseases, and in turn, kidney disease therapies, namely dialysis, put an additional strain on the environment (1). The narrative review by Bharati and colleagues (2) details the many associations and proposed mechanisms of climate change and kidney diseases (Figure 1). The increase in global temperature and extreme weather coupled with food and water scarcity is associated with acute kidney injury, kidney stones, and chronic kidney disease. Beyond the direct effect of heat injury and dehydration, population migration and industrialization lead to urban heat

Linda Awdishu

Pharmacists are essential drug experts on the health care team, providing clinical services related to safe distribution, optimal selection, and use of medications and patient education in the community, ambulatory care, and acute care pharmacy environments.

Pharmacists are trained at accredited schools of pharmacy that require a minimum of 2–4 years of undergraduate education before entering a 3- to 4-year doctorate training program (PharmD). During their doctorate training, they are licensed as pharmacy interns and begin gaining practice experience in the community and acute care settings, working under the supervision of a licensed pharmacist. After completing the PharmD degree, although

Linda Awdishu

Pharmacists are essential drug experts on the health care team, providing clinical services related to safe distribution, optimal selection, and use of medications and patient education in the community, ambulatory care, and acute care pharmacy environments.

Pharmacists are trained at accredited schools of pharmacy that require a minimum of 2–4 years of undergraduate education before entering a 3- to 4-year doctorate training program (PharmD). During their doctorate training, they are licensed as pharmacy interns and begin gaining practice experience in the community and acute care settings, working under the supervision of a licensed pharmacist. After completing the PharmD degree, although

Candice Halinski

The suboptimal outcomes experienced by patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are a direct result of flaws in the design of the health care delivery model. This is evidenced by lack of pre-existing nephrology care, high rates of dialysis initiation using a central venous catheter, increased morbidity and mortality, and low rates of preemptive transplantation (1). Improvement on the associated outcomes can be facilitated by the creation and deployment of supportive interdisciplinary care delivery models.

Under the Advancing American Kidney Health initiative, ambitious targets have been identified to improve on the care delivery model for patients with kidney

A diet higher in calcium and potassium intake may help to reduce the risk of recurrent kidney stones, concludes a study in Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

The prospective study included 411 patients with their first episode of symptomatic kidney stones, with obstruction confirmed by imaging or stone passage, along with 384 stone-free controls. Both groups completed an electronic food frequency questionnaire during a baseline study visit. Dietary risk factors were compared between groups. Dietary associations with validated symptomatic recurrence were analyzed in proportional hazards models, with adjustment for fluid and energy intake and for nondietary risk factors.

Baseline characteristics

A diet higher in calcium and potassium intake may help to reduce the risk of recurrent kidney stones, concludes a study in Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

The prospective study included 411 patients with their first episode of symptomatic kidney stones, with obstruction confirmed by imaging or stone passage, along with 384 stone-free controls. Both groups completed an electronic food frequency questionnaire during a baseline study visit. Dietary risk factors were compared between groups. Dietary associations with validated symptomatic recurrence were analyzed in proportional hazards models, with adjustment for fluid and energy intake and for nondietary risk factors.

Baseline characteristics

Individual-level estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) values differ substantially from measured GFR (mGFR) values, reports a study in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

The researchers analyzed data on 3223 participants in four US epidemiologic studies that included mGFR values. The mean age of participants was 59 years; 55% of participants were women, and 32% were Black.

The mGFR values were obtained using non-radiolabeled iothalamate in two studies, radiolabeled iothalamate in one study, and plasma clearance of iohexol in one study and were indexed to 1.73 m2 of body surface area. The eGFR values were calculated from

Kathleen Mallett and Sofia Thomas

The COVID-19 pandemic has been a catalyst for burnout in a strained health care workforce, especially in the emergency medicine and critical care sectors (1). The Association of American Medical Colleges projects a shortage of up to 139,000 physicians by 2033 (2). Burnout has contributed significantly to the “Great Resignation,” with a tremendous short-term impact on the US health care system, prompting the US Surgeon General to prioritize this crisis (2). It is difficult, however, to understand the long-term implications of this exodus (3), especially in nephrology.

Nephrologist burnout

Multiple factors have

Kathleen Mallett and Sofia Thomas

The COVID-19 pandemic has been a catalyst for burnout in a strained health care workforce, especially in the emergency medicine and critical care sectors (1). The Association of American Medical Colleges projects a shortage of up to 139,000 physicians by 2033 (2). Burnout has contributed significantly to the “Great Resignation,” with a tremendous short-term impact on the US health care system, prompting the US Surgeon General to prioritize this crisis (2). It is difficult, however, to understand the long-term implications of this exodus (3), especially in nephrology.

Nephrologist burnout

Multiple factors have

Kathleen Mallett and Sofia Thomas

The COVID-19 pandemic has been a catalyst for burnout in a strained health care workforce, especially in the emergency medicine and critical care sectors (1). The Association of American Medical Colleges projects a shortage of up to 139,000 physicians by 2033 (2). Burnout has contributed significantly to the “Great Resignation,” with a tremendous short-term impact on the US health care system, prompting the US Surgeon General to prioritize this crisis (2). It is difficult, however, to understand the long-term implications of this exodus (3), especially in nephrology.

Nephrologist burnout

Multiple factors have