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ASN Kidney News—the kidney community's leading newsmagazine— invites you to apply to be a KN Editorial Fellow.

Who can apply? Fellows entering their second, third, or fourth year of fellowship in nephrology with an interest in clinical nephrology, transplantation, basic research (physiology, pharmacology, or pathophysiology), or clinical research (observational research and clinical trials).

ASN Kidney News embraces diversity and equal opportunity. We are committed to building an inclusive culture that represents the diverse backgrounds, perspectives, and skills of the communities we serve globally.

How long is the appointment? Two years.

What are

Lesley C. Dinwiddie

First, let me congratulate you on yet another patient-centered edition. The June 2022 article No Filters: Assessing Physician Communication When Discussing Conservative Management of Kidney Failure by Drs. Corona and Koncicki (1) is timely, well researched, and to the point. It should become a “must read” for the entire nephrology community, especially those treating patients with advanced CKD [chronic kidney disease] and ESKD [end stage kidney disease].

Palliative care and conservative management have always seemed to be an “afterthought” or consigned to “other options” instead of being as vital a consideration as any of the forms of kidney

Lisa Koester

In 1972, nearly 40% of all patients on dialysis in the United States were on home dialysis. The next year, the Medicare End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Program began, and as a result, the use of home dialysis decreased dramatically. Over the years that have followed the establishment of the Medicare ESRD Program, there has been a resurgence of home dialysis, and research demonstrates that more frequent dialysis has better health outcomes than dialysis administered three times per week (1). U.S. Renal Data System (USRDS) data from 2019 reveal that 13.1% of prevalent patients with end stage kidney

Lisa Koester

In 1972, nearly 40% of all patients on dialysis in the United States were on home dialysis. The next year, the Medicare End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Program began, and as a result, the use of home dialysis decreased dramatically. Over the years that have followed the establishment of the Medicare ESRD Program, there has been a resurgence of home dialysis, and research demonstrates that more frequent dialysis has better health outcomes than dialysis administered three times per week (1). U.S. Renal Data System (USRDS) data from 2019 reveal that 13.1% of prevalent patients with end stage kidney

Jane Davis and Kim Zuber

In 1965, on opposite sides of the country, two revolutions in health care took place. In North Carolina, corpsmen returning from the Vietnam conflict put their skills and training to use in the newly formed profession: physician assistant (PA) (1, 2). In Colorado, registered nurses received postgraduate education, enabling them to provide health care in rural communities as nurse practitioners (NPs) (3). Both professions were formed to fill the need created simultaneously by a physician shortage and the increased numbers of patients eligible for health care under Medicare legislation (4). In 2021,

Jane Davis and Kim Zuber

In 1965, on opposite sides of the country, two revolutions in health care took place. In North Carolina, corpsmen returning from the Vietnam conflict put their skills and training to use in the newly formed profession: physician assistant (PA) (1, 2). In Colorado, registered nurses received postgraduate education, enabling them to provide health care in rural communities as nurse practitioners (NPs) (3). Both professions were formed to fill the need created simultaneously by a physician shortage and the increased numbers of patients eligible for health care under Medicare legislation (4). In 2021,

Jennifer Branch

I have been fortunate to work in the field of nephrology my entire career, mostly as a registered nurse for the first 20 years and now as an advanced practice provider over the past 3 years. I currently serve as an inpatient nurse practitioner in transplantation at an academic health system. For the first 2 years, I also had experience in outpatient clinics and dialysis units.

Outpatient clinic experience

Seeing patients on an outpatient basis during my outpatient clinic experience allowed me to review labs, medications, and health issues with many minutes of teaching while completing a full examination. Health

Jennifer Branch

I have been fortunate to work in the field of nephrology my entire career, mostly as a registered nurse for the first 20 years and now as an advanced practice provider over the past 3 years. I currently serve as an inpatient nurse practitioner in transplantation at an academic health system. For the first 2 years, I also had experience in outpatient clinics and dialysis units.

Outpatient clinic experience

Seeing patients on an outpatient basis during my outpatient clinic experience allowed me to review labs, medications, and health issues with many minutes of teaching while completing a full examination. Health

Candice Halinski

Originally trained to provide holistic primary care, nurse practitioners (NPs) practice in a variety of acute and chronic care settings. The pathway to practice requires candidates to pursue multiple educational prerequisites and degrees (Figure 1). These rigorous demands are likely to increase in the coming years. Education and training begins with the completion of baseline prerequisites in addition to the attainment of a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) and active licensure as a registered nurse (RN) in the state of practice. State licensure requires that candidates successfully pass a board certification examination formally known as the National

Candice Halinski

Originally trained to provide holistic primary care, nurse practitioners (NPs) practice in a variety of acute and chronic care settings. The pathway to practice requires candidates to pursue multiple educational prerequisites and degrees (Figure 1). These rigorous demands are likely to increase in the coming years. Education and training begins with the completion of baseline prerequisites in addition to the attainment of a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) and active licensure as a registered nurse (RN) in the state of practice. State licensure requires that candidates successfully pass a board certification examination formally known as the National