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Candice Halinski

The suboptimal outcomes experienced by patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are a direct result of flaws in the design of the health care delivery model. This is evidenced by lack of pre-existing nephrology care, high rates of dialysis initiation using a central venous catheter, increased morbidity and mortality, and low rates of preemptive transplantation (1). Improvement on the associated outcomes can be facilitated by the creation and deployment of supportive interdisciplinary care delivery models.

Under the Advancing American Kidney Health initiative, ambitious targets have been identified to improve on the care delivery model for patients with kidney

A diet higher in calcium and potassium intake may help to reduce the risk of recurrent kidney stones, concludes a study in Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

The prospective study included 411 patients with their first episode of symptomatic kidney stones, with obstruction confirmed by imaging or stone passage, along with 384 stone-free controls. Both groups completed an electronic food frequency questionnaire during a baseline study visit. Dietary risk factors were compared between groups. Dietary associations with validated symptomatic recurrence were analyzed in proportional hazards models, with adjustment for fluid and energy intake and for nondietary risk factors.

Baseline characteristics

A diet higher in calcium and potassium intake may help to reduce the risk of recurrent kidney stones, concludes a study in Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

The prospective study included 411 patients with their first episode of symptomatic kidney stones, with obstruction confirmed by imaging or stone passage, along with 384 stone-free controls. Both groups completed an electronic food frequency questionnaire during a baseline study visit. Dietary risk factors were compared between groups. Dietary associations with validated symptomatic recurrence were analyzed in proportional hazards models, with adjustment for fluid and energy intake and for nondietary risk factors.

Baseline characteristics

Individual-level estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) values differ substantially from measured GFR (mGFR) values, reports a study in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

The researchers analyzed data on 3223 participants in four US epidemiologic studies that included mGFR values. The mean age of participants was 59 years; 55% of participants were women, and 32% were Black.

The mGFR values were obtained using non-radiolabeled iothalamate in two studies, radiolabeled iothalamate in one study, and plasma clearance of iohexol in one study and were indexed to 1.73 m2 of body surface area. The eGFR values were calculated from

Kathleen Mallett and Sofia Thomas

The COVID-19 pandemic has been a catalyst for burnout in a strained health care workforce, especially in the emergency medicine and critical care sectors (1). The Association of American Medical Colleges projects a shortage of up to 139,000 physicians by 2033 (2). Burnout has contributed significantly to the “Great Resignation,” with a tremendous short-term impact on the US health care system, prompting the US Surgeon General to prioritize this crisis (2). It is difficult, however, to understand the long-term implications of this exodus (3), especially in nephrology.

Nephrologist burnout

Multiple factors have

Kathleen Mallett and Sofia Thomas

The COVID-19 pandemic has been a catalyst for burnout in a strained health care workforce, especially in the emergency medicine and critical care sectors (1). The Association of American Medical Colleges projects a shortage of up to 139,000 physicians by 2033 (2). Burnout has contributed significantly to the “Great Resignation,” with a tremendous short-term impact on the US health care system, prompting the US Surgeon General to prioritize this crisis (2). It is difficult, however, to understand the long-term implications of this exodus (3), especially in nephrology.

Nephrologist burnout

Multiple factors have

Kathleen Mallett and Sofia Thomas

The COVID-19 pandemic has been a catalyst for burnout in a strained health care workforce, especially in the emergency medicine and critical care sectors (1). The Association of American Medical Colleges projects a shortage of up to 139,000 physicians by 2033 (2). Burnout has contributed significantly to the “Great Resignation,” with a tremendous short-term impact on the US health care system, prompting the US Surgeon General to prioritize this crisis (2). It is difficult, however, to understand the long-term implications of this exodus (3), especially in nephrology.

Nephrologist burnout

Multiple factors have

Among this year's professionals in the kidney community who have passed away, four deceased kidney disease leaders are acknowledged here for their contributions to nephrology. Nancy Spaeth, considered the longest surviving kidney patient in the world; Christopher Blagg, MD, a persistent advocate for dialysis; Dale Singer, MHA, an elegant force and knowledgeable executive; and Jerry Yee, MD, FASN, a generous mentor, have all been seminal figures in the field.

Nancy Spaeth

A fateful decision in 1966 by the Seattle Artificial Kidney Center's Admissions and Policy Committee to allow Nancy Spaeth to begin dialysis likely changed the course of her life.

Eric Seaborg

The National Board of Physicians and Surgeons (NBPAS) apparently received another boost toward wider acceptance of its recertification program when The Joint Commission added the organization to its list of “designated equivalent source agencies” in its accreditation manuals.

The NBPAS was founded in 2015 in reaction to what its founders saw as the expensive and onerous maintenance of certification requirements of the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS) and the American Osteopathic Association. The NBPAS process is designed to provide “physicians with a choice in board recertification that is clinically rigorous, evidence-based, less burdensome, and nationally accepted,” according to its

Susan E. Quaggin

A silent public health crisis, kidney diseases affect approximately 10% of all Americans, or 37 million people. In addition to the burden of kidney diseases, management of patients with acute or chronic kidney diseases is complex and requires a dedicated team of experts to achieve the best possible outcomes.

In this month's ASN Kidney News, a series of articles highlight the key and evolving roles of advanced practice providers (APPs)—nurse practitioners (NPs) and physician associates (PAs; also called physician assistants)—as well as pharmacists, who are invaluable members of the kidney care team. The articles discuss career paths to