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Lupus Nephritis in 2017: An Update

  • 1 Wai Lang Lau, MD, is instructor of medicine and glomerular fellow, and
  • | 2 Gerald Appel MD, FASN, is professor of medicine at the Glomerular Center of Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons.
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In light of recent progress in the genomics of complex traits, where do we stand with glomerular disease?

Renal involvement is clinically apparent in approximately 50% of systemic lupus erythematosis (SLE) patients and a frequent cause of significant morbidity and mortality (1). On renal biopsy, virtually all lupus patients have some findings indicative of kidney pathology. The clinical presentation of lupus nephritis is highly varied, ranging from asymptomatic hematuria and/or proteinuria to the full nephrotic syndrome or even rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis. In the kidney, the cornerstone mechanism of damage is the formation and deposition of immune complexes (including

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