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Critical Care Nephrology: The Formidable Combination

  • 1 Kristin Hoover, MD, is a Nephrology and Critical Care Medicine Fellow with the Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Nephrology, Bone and Mineral Metabolism, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY. Amanda Dijanic Zeidman, MD, is an Assistant Professor with the Institute for Critical Care Medicine and Department of Medicine, Division of Nephrology, Mount Sinai, New York, NY. Javier A. Neyra, MD, MSCS, is an Associate Professor with the Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Nephrology, Bone and Mineral Metabolism, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY.
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What is nephrology critical care?

The census of hospitalized critically ill patients has risen over the last decades (1). As this population expands, leaders of intensive care units (ICUs) are attempting to diversify the healthcare team. A rapidly expanding area within the diversified ICU team is nephrology critical care. The combination of nephrology and critical care is a seamless amalgamation of physiology, pathobiology, and organ crosstalk, which renders the clinician equipped with expertise in acute kidney injury, acid-base/electrolyte disorders, and volume management (Figure 1).

Importantly, as the critically ill population becomes sicker, reliance on

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