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To Ligate or Not Ligate Arteriovenous Accesses: PRO

  • 1 Aisha Shaikh, MD, is affiliated with the James J. Peters Veterans Affairs Medical Center in New York City.
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Arteriovenous fistula (AVF) is the preferred vascular access in hemodialysis patients because of its superior long-term patency and low risk of infection (1). The impact of AVF on the cardiovascular (CV) system has been an area of interest to the scientific community for decades, from the time soldiers sustained traumatic AVF in the battlefield to the first description of AVF use in dialysis patients in 1966 (2).

The creation of an AVF between an artery and a vein diverts the blood from the high-resistance capillary system to the low-resistance venous system. The shunting of blood causes

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