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Nephrology Fellowship Education: Moving Apart to Come Together during COVID-19

  • 1 Sam Kant, MD, is a nephrology fellow at Johns Hopkins Hospital. C. John Sperati, MD, MHS, is associate professor of medicine and fellowship program director at Johns Hopkins University.
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SARS-CoV-2 infection, the causative agent of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), was declared a pandemic on March 11, 2020, with more than 1.4 million people afflicted by April 8, 2020, and more than 80,000 deaths (1). Physical distancing is the cornerstone of slowing disease transmission to mitigate an overwhelming demand for healthcare resources that exceeds capacity. This strategy was used as early as the fifth century BC (2), more recently during the 1918 influenza pandemic, and during the 2009 severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and 2012 Middle East Respiratory Syndrome epidemics. Early physical distancing has in part

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