• 1.

    Elliott J, et al. Substantial reductions in the number of diabetic ketoacidosis and severe hypoglycaemia episodes requiring emergency treatment lead to reduced costs after structured education in adults with type 1 diabetes. Diabet Med 2014; 31:847853.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 2.

    The NHS Long Term Plan. NHS England, 2019.

  • 3.

    Taylor DM, et al. A systematic review of the prevalence and associations of limited health literacy in CKD. Clin J Am Soc Nephrol 2017; 12:10701084.

  • 4.

    Nitsch D, et al. Outcomes in patients on home haemodialysis in England and Wales, 1997–2005: a comparative cohort analysis. Nephrol Dial Transplant 2011; 26:16701677.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 5.

    Wilkie M, Barnes T. Shared hemodialysis care: increasing patient involvement in center-based dialysis. Clin J Am Soc Nephrol 2019; 14021404.

  • 6.

    Glidewell L, et al. Using behavioural theories to optimise shared haemodialysis care: a qualitative intervention development study of patient and professional experience. Implement Sci 2013; 8:118.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 7.

    Fotheringham J, et al. Rationale and design for SHAREHD: a quality improvement collaborative to scale up shared haemodialysis care for patients on centre based haemodialysis. BMC Nephrol 2017; 18:335.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation
  • 8.

    Morton RL, Sellars M. From patient-centered to person-centered care for kidney diseases. Clin J Am Soc Nephrol 2019; 14:623625.

  • 9.

    Chan CT, et al. Dialysis initiation, modality choice, access, and prescription: conclusions from a Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) Controversies Conference. Kidney Int 2019; 96:3747.

    • Crossref
    • Search Google Scholar
    • Export Citation

Shared-Care Dialysis Improves Patient Outcomes: Building the Evidence

  • 1 Martin Wilkie, MD, FRCP, is a consultant renal physician at Sheffield Teaching Hospitals, NHS Foundation Trust. Steve Ariss, PhD, is a senior research fellow, ScHARR, at The University of Sheffield.
Restricted access

All across medicine, there is strong evidence that people who understand and are engaged in their own healthcare have better outcomes. There are several reasons for this, including being able to make quality healthcare choices, knowing when to seek help, and knowing how to reduce the risk for the development of complications (1). The body of literature in this area is large; diabetes mellitus care is a strong example. Indeed, it is not possible to deliver successful diabetes care without high levels of patient engagement, and there has been considerable interest and investment in patient training to improve

Save