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Vitamin K and Vascular Calcification

  • 1 Pascale Khairallah, MD, is a nephrology fellow at Columbia University Medical Center.
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Pascale Khairallah

Despite many advances in the care of patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and ESKD, cardiovascular (CV) disease remains the leading cause of death in the kidney disease patient population. One of the factors explaining this excess mortality risk is vascular calcification, which predisposes patients to myocardial ischemia, left ventricular hypertrophy, and stroke (1).

The pathophysiology of vascular calcification in patients with CKD and ESKD is distinct from that in the general population. In the general population, vascular calcifications form in the intima of vessels and are linked to traditionally modifiable risk factors, including smoking, age,

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