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The Death of Contrast-Induced Nephropathy Is Premature

  • 1 Michael R. Rudnick, MD, and Amanda Leonberg-Yoo, MD, are affiliated with the Perelman School of Medicine of the University of Pennsylvania, Penn Presbyterian Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA.
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The occurrence of acute kidney injury (AKI) resulting from the intravascular administration of contrast media (CM), commonly referred to as contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN), has become firmly entrenched.

CIN has been described with both intra-arterial and intravenous (IV) administration of CM. Most clinical studies of CIN occur in a population receiving CM during coronary angiography, even though most intravascular CM exposures occur via IV administration during contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT).

Within the past decade, an increasing number of studies have called into question the true incidence and even the existence of CIN after IV CM administration. This has led some physicians

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