California State Senate Working on Bill to Address Dialysis Staffing Problems

By ASN Staff

SB – 349 Chronic dialysis clinics: staffing requirements was introduced into the California Senate on February 14th, 2017 where it remains through several amendments. 

“The bill would be the first law in the United States to set such limits, though seven other states have set minimum staffing through administrative regulations: Georgia, Maryland, Massachusetts, Oregon, South Carolina, Texas, and Utah, according to an analysis by the Service Employees International Union, the chief backers of the bill.”

“The California legislation would require a minimum ratio of 1 nurse for every 8 patients, 1 technician for every 3 patients, and 1 social worker for every 75 patients. It would require that dialysis chairs remain empty for 45 minutes between patients. It would also set minimum requirements for inspections and imposes penalties on clinic administrators who fail to meet the new rules. "This legislation will really allow the technicians and nurses to take care of the patients in the way that they're supposed to be taken care of," says [Megallan] Handford [RN].”

Please see the full article in Medscape for additional coverage.

Category:
Subcategory:
Author:
ASN Staff
Article Image:
Body:

SB – 349 Chronic dialysis clinics: staffing requirements was introduced into the California Senate on February 14th, 2017 where it remains through several amendments. 

“The bill would be the first law in the United States to set such limits, though seven other states have set minimum staffing through administrative regulations: Georgia, Maryland, Massachusetts, Oregon, South Carolina, Texas, and Utah, according to an analysis by the Service Employees International Union, the chief backers of the bill.”

“The California legislation would require a minimum ratio of 1 nurse for every 8 patients, 1 technician for every 3 patients, and 1 social worker for every 75 patients. It would require that dialysis chairs remain empty for 45 minutes between patients. It would also set minimum requirements for inspections and imposes penalties on clinic administrators who fail to meet the new rules. "This legislation will really allow the technicians and nurses to take care of the patients in the way that they're supposed to be taken care of," says [Megallan] Handford [RN].”

Please see the full article in Medscape for additional coverage.

Area(s) of Interest: