In Case You Missed it: Opening Day Plenary Session - ASN President Eleanor D. Lederer, MD, FASN and ASN President's Medal recipients

By ASN Staff

The first plenary session of Kidney Week 2017 took off on Thursday morning with an address from ASN President Dr. Eleanor Lederer.

She began by thanking her family, colleagues, trainees, and mentors who helped her throughout her career.

Dr. Lederer focused quickly on dispelling the idea that nephrology is in crisis. Though some training program spots are going unfilled, and some researchers are leaving nephrology for other studies, nephrology has advanced incredibly in the last 35 years. She displayed a slide highlighting an array of new discoveries in the last 35 years: new signaling pathways, new targets, new transporters, and new therapies.

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Dr. Lederer encouraged attendees to take back CKD, and tell everyone what they’re doing in order to advance nephrology at the dawn of a new age. It’s not possible to dialyze patients into health, and Dr. Lederer urged kidney professionals to research new options and approaches to practice beyond preparing patients for dialysis and/or transplantation.

ASN: Advancing Needed Change

Dr. Lederer described how the American Society of Nephrology (ASN) has been changing and updating. Policy activities at ASN have been helping address the need to fund innovative kidney research. The recent U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO) report confirmed the urgent need for greater research funding in nephrology. In addition, other organizations within the kidney community are propelling new solutions to challenges in kidney care. ASN has advanced several government collaborations including the Kidney Health Initiative (KHI), Nephrologists Transforming Dialysis Safety (NTDS), the VA Center for Innovation, and one program Dr. Lederer is especially excited about, the HHS Accelerator, which will accelerate therapies for kidney disease.

Workforce, Training, and Career Advancement

ASN is also developing new programs in workforce, training, and career advancement. For instance, Kidney TREKS (Tutored Research and Education for Kidney Scholars) has expanded its week-long research course retreat and long-term mentorship program to a second location. ASN’s commitment to diversity and inclusion has propelled changes in governance (extended voter rights and membership, altered council structure, expanded committee structure and membership), partnerships focused on increasing leadership among groups underrepresented in medicine (such as the ASN-RWJF Harold Amos Award) increased exchange (communities and social media), and outreach. It has also increased female participation at ASN on all levels.

plenary session thurs 2.jpgIn conclusion, Dr. Lederer finished with several options for attendees to get involved with ASN including supporting, engaging, and leading. She mentioned there’s no need to chair a committee in order to participate but can be done by voting in the annual election, submitting a manuscript to JASN and CJASN, or joining an ASN Community.

ASN President’s Medal

The President’s Medal was awarded this year to two patient advocates, Paul T. Conway and Richard A. Knight, MBA. The two friends and former transplant patients spoke of a necessity to change the status quo of dialysis hoping for a future that’s not just a growing donor list. They called for attendees to take action: noting there was enough push and power within the room to make something happen in the government using the example of the End Stage Renal Disease Program (ESRD) under Medicare, signed in 1972 and supported by a group of patients and doctors working together.

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The first plenary session of Kidney Week 2017 took off on Thursday morning with an address from ASN President Dr. Eleanor Lederer.

She began by thanking her family, colleagues, trainees, and mentors who helped her throughout her career.

Dr. Lederer focused quickly on dispelling the idea that nephrology is in crisis. Though some training program spots are going unfilled, and some researchers are leaving nephrology for other studies, nephrology has advanced incredibly in the last 35 years. She displayed a slide highlighting an array of new discoveries in the last 35 years: new signaling pathways, new targets, new transporters, and new therapies.

top 10.PNG

Dr. Lederer encouraged attendees to take back CKD, and tell everyone what they’re doing in order to advance nephrology at the dawn of a new age. It’s not possible to dialyze patients into health, and Dr. Lederer urged kidney professionals to research new options and approaches to practice beyond preparing patients for dialysis and/or transplantation.

ASN: Advancing Needed Change

Dr. Lederer described how the American Society of Nephrology (ASN) has been changing and updating. Policy activities at ASN have been helping address the need to fund innovative kidney research. The recent U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO) report confirmed the urgent need for greater research funding in nephrology. In addition, other organizations within the kidney community are propelling new solutions to challenges in kidney care. ASN has advanced several government collaborations including the Kidney Health Initiative (KHI), Nephrologists Transforming Dialysis Safety (NTDS), the VA Center for Innovation, and one program Dr. Lederer is especially excited about, the HHS Accelerator, which will accelerate therapies for kidney disease.

Workforce, Training, and Career Advancement

ASN is also developing new programs in workforce, training, and career advancement. For instance, Kidney TREKS (Tutored Research and Education for Kidney Scholars) has expanded its week-long research course retreat and long-term mentorship program to a second location. ASN’s commitment to diversity and inclusion has propelled changes in governance (extended voter rights and membership, altered council structure, expanded committee structure and membership), partnerships focused on increasing leadership among groups underrepresented in medicine (such as the ASN-RWJF Harold Amos Award) increased exchange (communities and social media), and outreach. It has also increased female participation at ASN on all levels.

plenary session thurs 2.jpgIn conclusion, Dr. Lederer finished with several options for attendees to get involved with ASN including supporting, engaging, and leading. She mentioned there’s no need to chair a committee in order to participate but can be done by voting in the annual election, submitting a manuscript to JASN and CJASN, or joining an ASN Community.

ASN President’s Medal

The President’s Medal was awarded this year to two patient advocates, Paul T. Conway and Richard A. Knight, MBA. The two friends and former transplant patients spoke of a necessity to change the status quo of dialysis hoping for a future that’s not just a growing donor list. They called for attendees to take action: noting there was enough push and power within the room to make something happen in the government using the example of the End Stage Renal Disease Program (ESRD) under Medicare, signed in 1972 and supported by a group of patients and doctors working together.

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Date:
Thursday, November 2, 2017