Kidney Week 2016

Kidney Week 2016

Chicago—Wider use of intensive control of systolic blood pressure could save the lives of as many as 32,145 individuals with chronic kidney disease each year, estimated a study presented at Kidney Week 2016.

A safe, inexpensive pre-transplant intervention can reduce graft loss and mortality, according to late-breaking trial results presented during Kidney Week 2016.

Smoking may partly counteract the benefits of treatment with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE inhibitors) for patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), according to a study presented at Kidney Week 2016.

Smoking has been linked to worsening kidney decline, but the exact mechanisms are unclear, according to lead author Bethany Roehm, MD, of Tufts Medical Center in Boston.

Chicago—Too little and poor quality sleep are associated with a greater risk of kidney failure, according to results from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort Study (CRIC) presented at Kidney Week 2016.

While sleep disorders are common in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), how poor sleep may affect disease progression is not clear, according to the study’s lead author Ana C. Ricardo, MD, MPH, an assistant professor in the division of nephrology at the University of Illinois College of Medicine at Chicago.

Chicago—Stem cells from patients with polycystic kidney disease have been coaxed into growing into kidney-like structures, which may aid researchers studying the disease, according to a study presented at Kidney Week 2016.

Ryuji Morizane, MD, PhD, an instructor and scientist in the Brigham and Women’s Hospital Renal Division in Boston, and his colleagues presented data on how they grew the kidney-like structures, called kidney organoids. They also described the features of the kidney organoids and the disease features they recreate.

Use of palliative care among patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD) has increased steadily since 2004, but use among minority patients lags behind whites, according to a study presented at Kidney Week 2016.

Lifestyle factors, particularly higher body mass index (BMI), appear to explain the lower risk of end stage renal disease (ERSD) in women compared with men, according to data from the Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study presented at Kidney Week 2016.