Glomerular Disease

Glomerular Disease

The therapy of proliferative lupus nephritis (LN) is generally divided into an initial phase of high-intensity immunosuppression to induce prompt clinical improvement, followed by a maintenance phase of lower-intensity immunosuppression to consolidate improvement into remission. Induction most often lasts 3 to 6 months, but maintenance lasts years and often indefinitely. The average duration of maintenance therapy in several recent randomized clinical trials was 3.5 years but ranged beyond 5 years.

Pregnancy in Women with Glomerular and other Chronic Kidney Disease and the Need for International Collaboration

Patients with kidney disease are at increased maternal and fetal risk during pregnancy. In particular, glomerular-based kidney disease is overrepresented among younger patient populations and is therefore a common form of kidney disease that requires management during pregnancy. Potential untoward outcomes include progression of underlying renal dysfunction, worsening of urine protein excretion and hypertension, and untoward fetal outcomes including intrauterine growth restriction and preterm delivery.

The treatment of idiopathic membranous nephropathy (IMN) has been a matter of discussion for many years. Given the variable clinical course and potential toxicity of current regimens, the main issue nephrologists face at the moment are who to treat and with what regimen. Conservative management is justified for patients with subnephrotic proteinuria, inasmuch as spontaneous remission occurs more frequently in these patients, and their long-term prognosis is usually excellent.

In the past several years, major progress has been made in understanding the mechanisms underlying the development and progression of IgA nephropathy (IgAN). These advances have contributed to the generation of an ever-expanding catalog of measurable variables that provide diagnostic or prognostic information about IgAN. Such measures span the gamut from immune mediators and metabolites detectable in serum or urine, to genetic and epigenetic traits, to histologic features both traditional and novel.

Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN), also termed mesangiocapillary glomerulonephritis, is a diagnosis based on a glomerular injury pattern common to a heterogeneous group of diseases (1). MPGN is characterized by both an inflammatory (proliferative) and resolving (membrane) phase.

The main goal of the Nephrotic Syndrome Study Network, NEPTUNE, is to build a translational research infrastructure for diseases manifesting as nephrotic syndrome (NS), which includes focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), minimal change disease (MCD), and membranous nephropathy (MN) (1). The network of investigators from 21 academic centers across the United States and Canada, and two patient interest groups, the NephCure Foundation and the Halpin Foundation, have worked closely together to study these rare glomerular diseases.

Advancing Understanding and Treatment of Glomerular Disease

Primary glomerular disease is an important cause of chronic and end stage renal disease

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is increasingly recognized as a growing global challenge, affecting up to 16 percent of the adult population (1,2). Although the veritable explosion in type II diabetes is largely responsible for this growth in developed and many developing countries, primary glomerular disease continues to contribute meaningfully to the CKD epidemic (2). These diseases account for roughly 10 percent of CKD cases in the United States and up to 50 percent in other countries (3, 4). Primary glomerular diseases contribute to considerable morbidity, cost, and mortality.