JASN - Gene Editing: Powerful New Tools for Nephrology Research and Therapy

By Ayano Miyagi, Aiwu Lu, and Benjamin D. Humphreys

In the October 2016 issue of JASN, the following article was published focused on new technology, especially the CRISPR/Cas system, and how it may be used for Nephrology research and therapy.

Please read the abstract below and the full text is available at the JASN website and via PDF.

Abstract

Biologic research is experiencing a transformation brought about by the ability of programmable nucleases to manipulate the genome. In the recently developed CRISPR/Cas system, short RNA sequences guide the endonuclease Cas9 to any location in the genome, causing a DNA double–strand break (DSB). Repair of DSBs allows the introduction of targeted genetic manipulations with high precision. Cas9–mediated gene editing is simple, scalable, and rapid, and it can be applied to virtually any organism. Here, we summarize the development of modern gene editing techniques and the biology of DSB repair on which these techniques are based. We discuss technical points in applying this technology and review its use in model organisms. Finally, we describe prospects for the use of gene editing to treat human genetic diseases. This technology offers tremendous promise for equipping the nephrology research community to better model and ultimately, treat kidney diseases.

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Ayano Miyagi, Aiwu Lu, and Benjamin D. Humphreys
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In the October 2016 issue of JASN, the following article was published focused on new technology, especially the CRISPR/Cas system, and how it may be used for Nephrology research and therapy.

Please read the abstract below and the full text is available at the JASN website and via PDF.

Abstract

Biologic research is experiencing a transformation brought about by the ability of programmable nucleases to manipulate the genome. In the recently developed CRISPR/Cas system, short RNA sequences guide the endonuclease Cas9 to any location in the genome, causing a DNA double–strand break (DSB). Repair of DSBs allows the introduction of targeted genetic manipulations with high precision. Cas9–mediated gene editing is simple, scalable, and rapid, and it can be applied to virtually any organism. Here, we summarize the development of modern gene editing techniques and the biology of DSB repair on which these techniques are based. We discuss technical points in applying this technology and review its use in model organisms. Finally, we describe prospects for the use of gene editing to treat human genetic diseases. This technology offers tremendous promise for equipping the nephrology research community to better model and ultimately, treat kidney diseases.