Conducting Trials in Nephrology: Challenges and Conclusions

By ASN Staff

"Nephrologists around the world are intimately familiar with the lack of randomized, controlled clinical trials (RCTs) in nephrology. Indeed, an increasingly larger portion of providers is relying on nonrandomized and biased trial data to make daily clinical decisions. Clinicians, who have waited years for trialists to execute RCTs, are beginning to accept the notion that perfection is the enemy of good. They believe that nonrandomized trials, with their known biases and flaws, are good enough for nephrologists and our patients. Thankfully, there are some trialists who refuse to accept this notion and are actively working to change the way in which evidence-based data are generated.

The Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) group convened a meeting of stakeholders in September 2016 to identify challenges and make recommendations to improve trial data in nephrology.[1] Their conclusions were made public nearly 8 months later and are briefly reported in the full article on Medscape".

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"Nephrologists around the world are intimately familiar with the lack of randomized, controlled clinical trials (RCTs) in nephrology. Indeed, an increasingly larger portion of providers is relying on nonrandomized and biased trial data to make daily clinical decisions. Clinicians, who have waited years for trialists to execute RCTs, are beginning to accept the notion that perfection is the enemy of good. They believe that nonrandomized trials, with their known biases and flaws, are good enough for nephrologists and our patients. Thankfully, there are some trialists who refuse to accept this notion and are actively working to change the way in which evidence-based data are generated.

The Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) group convened a meeting of stakeholders in September 2016 to identify challenges and make recommendations to improve trial data in nephrology.[1] Their conclusions were made public nearly 8 months later and are briefly reported in the full article on Medscape".

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Monday, October 9, 2017