7 CRISPR projects in US receive $65 million total funding from DARPA

By ASN Staff

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) announced $65 million in funding on July 19th, 2017 to seven projects in the US to further improve safety and accuracy of gene editing.

Renee Wegrzyn, who manages DARPA’s Safe Genes program stated that “the field of gene editing has been advancing at an astounding pace, opening the door to previously impossible genetic solutions but without much emphasis on how to mitigate potential downsides”.

“’If successful, we will create a revolutionary platform for using and controlling gene editing for both clinical and biotechnology applications, with wide-ranging benefits for treating infectious diseases and cancer’, said Jennifer Doudna, a professor at UC Berkeley who co-invented CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing.

A direct outcome from this newly funded research for kidney-specific benefits is yet to be determined; however, as the funds turn out additional research, an application to the kidney space is plausible.

An increase in funding shows the potential benefits of CRISPR-Cas9 and a determination to improve the safety and accuracy of gene editing for future use.

Please read the full articles below for more information:

  1. Defense department pours $65 million into making CRISPR safer, Berkeley News
  2. US defence agencies grapple with gene drives, Nature
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The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) announced $65 million in funding on July 19th, 2017 to seven projects in the US to further improve safety and accuracy of gene editing.

Renee Wegrzyn, who manages DARPA’s Safe Genes program stated that “the field of gene editing has been advancing at an astounding pace, opening the door to previously impossible genetic solutions but without much emphasis on how to mitigate potential downsides”.

“’If successful, we will create a revolutionary platform for using and controlling gene editing for both clinical and biotechnology applications, with wide-ranging benefits for treating infectious diseases and cancer’, said Jennifer Doudna, a professor at UC Berkeley who co-invented CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing.

A direct outcome from this newly funded research for kidney-specific benefits is yet to be determined; however, as the funds turn out additional research, an application to the kidney space is plausible.

An increase in funding shows the potential benefits of CRISPR-Cas9 and a determination to improve the safety and accuracy of gene editing for future use.

Please read the full articles below for more information:

  1. Defense department pours $65 million into making CRISPR safer, Berkeley News
  2. US defence agencies grapple with gene drives, Nature
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