Roughly 5,000 Puerto Ricans with kidney disease at risk with limited access to dialysis

By ASN Staff

“It’s one of the most pressing health issues facing residents of the U.S. territory dealing with scores of medical crises in the aftermath of a hurricane that has knocked out power.

Hospitals running on generators are low on power, and conditions on the ground are ripe for the spread of disease.

People with kidney disease are especially at risk because they need to get dialysis roughly three times a week… But the dialysis centers, which need power and water to operate, are short on diesel fuel for their generators. And many patients do not have fuel for their cars to get to the centers in the first place.

Mike Spigler, vice president of patient services at the American Kidney Fund, said that it is an ‘extremely tenuous situation’ for the roughly 5,000 people on the island who rely on dialysis to stay alive. The dialysis centers need diesel fuel to power their generators and ‘a lot of them are down to a day or two of fuel’ he said”.

“FEMA said that as of Thursday (Sep. 27th) more than half of the dialysis centers in Puerto Rico are open and the agency is working to evacuate people to the continental United States”.

“FEMA reported that 25 of the 69 hospitals on the island are not operational”.

Read the full story on The Hill.

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“It’s one of the most pressing health issues facing residents of the U.S. territory dealing with scores of medical crises in the aftermath of a hurricane that has knocked out power.

Hospitals running on generators are low on power, and conditions on the ground are ripe for the spread of disease.

People with kidney disease are especially at risk because they need to get dialysis roughly three times a week… But the dialysis centers, which need power and water to operate, are short on diesel fuel for their generators. And many patients do not have fuel for their cars to get to the centers in the first place.

Mike Spigler, vice president of patient services at the American Kidney Fund, said that it is an ‘extremely tenuous situation’ for the roughly 5,000 people on the island who rely on dialysis to stay alive. The dialysis centers need diesel fuel to power their generators and ‘a lot of them are down to a day or two of fuel’ he said”.

“FEMA said that as of Thursday (Sep. 27th) more than half of the dialysis centers in Puerto Rico are open and the agency is working to evacuate people to the continental United States”.

“FEMA reported that 25 of the 69 hospitals on the island are not operational”.

Read the full story on The Hill.

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Wednesday, October 4, 2017