Dr. Alexander Hamilton on recent CJASN study, "Sociodemographic, Psychologic Health and Lifestyle Outcomes in Young Adults on Renal Replacement Therapy"

By ASN Staff

A recent study was published online in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (CJASN) entitled “Sociodemographic, Psychologic Health and Lifestyle Outcomes in Young Adults on Renal Replacement Therapy” in October 2017.

Please access it on the CJASN website.

To get a behind-the-scenes look into the recent study, Kidney News Online asked Dr. Alexander J. Hamilton, the Tony Wing Clinical Research Fellow at the University of Bristol Medical School, to answer several questions about the findings and what they mean for the future.

1. To a member of the general public, how would you briefly describe the findings of this study?

We searched databases of medical literature to find studies concerning the psychosocial health and lifestyle of young people with kidney failure requiring a transplant or dialysis treatment. We analyzed 60 studies with a total of 15,575 participants. The studies we found were largely single center cross-sectional studies of those transplanted in childhood.

Compared with healthy peers, young adults with kidney failure had lower quality of life, worse for dialysis patients compared with transplant patients. They were more likely to be unemployed – despite no differences in the likelihood of higher education - and to live in the family home. They were also less likely to be married or have a partner. Alcohol abstinence and smoking status did not differ.

2. Why do you believe these findings matter? What is the importance?

We know that most young people with end-stage kidney disease have a kidney transplant, but they are high-risk for the transplanted kidney to fail. There has been a lot of focus both on programs to improve the transition between pediatric and adult care for kidney patients, and clinical end-points. It is vital to understand how kidney failure affects social goals, because by defining these we can seek interventions to improve areas of deficit. These areas really matter to patients.

3. And for which groups does it matter? Kidney disease patients, the general public, physicians?

alexander_hamilton.jpegThese findings are important for young kidney disease patients because we are seeing limited life chances associated with having kidney failure.  It is also important that physicians are aware of the findings as this raises awareness in the clinical setting, so greater efforts may be made to tackle the psychosocial disadvantage.

4. What effect do you think your team's proof of these findings will have on the future of treating patients?

Our review highlights the common outcomes that existing work has focused upon, but also the gaps, which are helpful for designing future studies. Now that these findings have been established, we can explore predictors of key outcomes, and examine potential interventions to improve them.

 

If you have any further questions on this study or the broader topic, please contact info@kidneynews.org.

Category:
Subcategory:
Author:
ASN Staff
Article Image:
Body:

A recent study was published online in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (CJASN) entitled “Sociodemographic, Psychologic Health and Lifestyle Outcomes in Young Adults on Renal Replacement Therapy” in October 2017.

Please access it on the CJASN website.

To get a behind-the-scenes look into the recent study, Kidney News Online asked Dr. Alexander J. Hamilton, the Tony Wing Clinical Research Fellow at the University of Bristol Medical School, to answer several questions about the findings and what they mean for the future.

1. To a member of the general public, how would you briefly describe the findings of this study?

We searched databases of medical literature to find studies concerning the psychosocial health and lifestyle of young people with kidney failure requiring a transplant or dialysis treatment. We analyzed 60 studies with a total of 15,575 participants. The studies we found were largely single center cross-sectional studies of those transplanted in childhood.

Compared with healthy peers, young adults with kidney failure had lower quality of life, worse for dialysis patients compared with transplant patients. They were more likely to be unemployed – despite no differences in the likelihood of higher education - and to live in the family home. They were also less likely to be married or have a partner. Alcohol abstinence and smoking status did not differ.

2. Why do you believe these findings matter? What is the importance?

We know that most young people with end-stage kidney disease have a kidney transplant, but they are high-risk for the transplanted kidney to fail. There has been a lot of focus both on programs to improve the transition between pediatric and adult care for kidney patients, and clinical end-points. It is vital to understand how kidney failure affects social goals, because by defining these we can seek interventions to improve areas of deficit. These areas really matter to patients.

3. And for which groups does it matter? Kidney disease patients, the general public, physicians?

alexander_hamilton.jpegThese findings are important for young kidney disease patients because we are seeing limited life chances associated with having kidney failure.  It is also important that physicians are aware of the findings as this raises awareness in the clinical setting, so greater efforts may be made to tackle the psychosocial disadvantage.

4. What effect do you think your team's proof of these findings will have on the future of treating patients?

Our review highlights the common outcomes that existing work has focused upon, but also the gaps, which are helpful for designing future studies. Now that these findings have been established, we can explore predictors of key outcomes, and examine potential interventions to improve them.

 

If you have any further questions on this study or the broader topic, please contact info@kidneynews.org.

Area(s) of Interest:
Date:
Thursday, November 9, 2017