HHS: How to avoid grant scams

By ASN Staff

An article from HHS outlines how to avoid grant scams and what to do if you think you have been a victim of a scam.

  • Don't give out your bank account information to anyone you don't know. Scammers pressure people to divulge their bank account information so that they can steal the money in the account. Always keep your bank account information confidential. Don't share it unless you are familiar with the company and know why the information is necessary.
  • Don't pay any money for a "free" government grant. If you have to pay money to claim a "free" government grant, it isn't a government grant and it isn't really free. A real government agency won't ask you to pay a processing fee for a grant that you have already been awarded—or to pay for a list of grant-making institutions. Specifically, Federal government agencies and employees never ask people to wire money or use a prepaid debit card to pay for anything. Be careful. Prepaid cards and money transfers are like sending cash—once it's gone, you can't get it back.
  • Check the USA.gov Index of Government Agencies—Look-alikes aren't the real thing. Just because the caller says he's from the “Federal Grants Administration” doesn’t mean that he is. There is no such government agency. Take a moment to check the USA.gov site or the blue pages in your telephone directory to bear out your hunch—or not.
  • Take control of the calls you receive. If you want to reduce the number of telemarketing calls you receive, place your telephone number on the National Do Not Call Registry. To register online, visit donotcall.gov. To register by phone, call 1-888-382-1222 (TTY: 1-866-290-4236) from the phone number you wish to register.
  • File a complaint with the FTC. If you think you may have been a victim of a government grant scam, file a complaint with the FTC, or call toll-free, 1-877-FTC-HELP (1-877-382-4357); TTY: 1-866-653-4261. The FTC enters Internet, telemarketing, identity theft, and other fraud-related complaints into Consumer Sentinel, a secure online database available to hundreds of civil and criminal law enforcement agencies in the United States and abroad.


Please read the full article for additional information.

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An article from HHS outlines how to avoid grant scams and what to do if you think you have been a victim of a scam.

  • Don't give out your bank account information to anyone you don't know. Scammers pressure people to divulge their bank account information so that they can steal the money in the account. Always keep your bank account information confidential. Don't share it unless you are familiar with the company and know why the information is necessary.
  • Don't pay any money for a "free" government grant. If you have to pay money to claim a "free" government grant, it isn't a government grant and it isn't really free. A real government agency won't ask you to pay a processing fee for a grant that you have already been awarded—or to pay for a list of grant-making institutions. Specifically, Federal government agencies and employees never ask people to wire money or use a prepaid debit card to pay for anything. Be careful. Prepaid cards and money transfers are like sending cash—once it's gone, you can't get it back.
  • Check the USA.gov Index of Government Agencies—Look-alikes aren't the real thing. Just because the caller says he's from the “Federal Grants Administration” doesn’t mean that he is. There is no such government agency. Take a moment to check the USA.gov site or the blue pages in your telephone directory to bear out your hunch—or not.
  • Take control of the calls you receive. If you want to reduce the number of telemarketing calls you receive, place your telephone number on the National Do Not Call Registry. To register online, visit donotcall.gov. To register by phone, call 1-888-382-1222 (TTY: 1-866-290-4236) from the phone number you wish to register.
  • File a complaint with the FTC. If you think you may have been a victim of a government grant scam, file a complaint with the FTC, or call toll-free, 1-877-FTC-HELP (1-877-382-4357); TTY: 1-866-653-4261. The FTC enters Internet, telemarketing, identity theft, and other fraud-related complaints into Consumer Sentinel, a secure online database available to hundreds of civil and criminal law enforcement agencies in the United States and abroad.


Please read the full article for additional information.

Date:
Monday, December 4, 2017